Episode 268: An Antioch Christmas Encore – “A Musical Christmas Special.”

This Antioch Encore was originally recorded and released in 2020

Songs:

  1.  O Come All Ye Faithful
    2.  Silent Night
    3.  Angels We Have Heard on High
    4.  O Little Town of Bethlehem
    5.  Sweet Little Jesus Boy
    6.  Come Thou Long Expected Jesus
    7.  Lo How a Rose E’er Blooming
    8.  Hark the Herald Angels Sing
    9.  Jesus the Light of the World
    10.  Go Tell It On the Mountain
    11.  Joy to the World
    12.  Jesus, Jesus Oh What a Wonderful Child

 

CREDITS:
All musical arrangements and improvisations by Eric Nykamp

Episode 267: An Antioch Christmas Encore – “Our Christmas Memories.”

This is an encore episode of the Antioch Podcast recorded in 2022. We are a diverse group of Christian antiracism educators and friends who gather every week to share stories of our lives, which some of the time has to do directly with our experiences as antiracism educators. We also are whole people – people who enjoy telling stories. So this week, we thought we would gather to share some goodhearted storytelling about our memories of Christmas – some sentimental, some silly, and some … well, you will see.

Episode 266: Christianity and CRT – “Reflections on the Journey.”

I know that I don’t tend to sit down and ask people, “Hey, what do you think about CRT?” probably because I don’t know what I’d hear… or maybe I do have a guess about what they might say and I’m self-protectively trying to avoid arguments and anger in the event that my guess was correct.

In these polarized times, sometimes the things that I might find interesting or important are threatening or angering to other people.

Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou, the authors of Christianity and Critical Race Theory: a Faithful and Constructive Conversation boldly enter this culture war conversation with a pastor’s heart, and we on the Antioch Podcast have taken this last season to read and discuss their book together. It has been an illuminating journey, and I don’t know about you, but our team has really grown from going through this book together.

So today, our team gathered around my kitchen table, along with my dog, to share our final thoughts together about the book.


CREDITS:
Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

Episode 265: Christianity and CRT – “A New Hope.”

Before his eventual execution for being a Christian, the apostle Paul wrote these words from his Roman prison cell, “I consider that our present sufferings are not worth comparing with the glory that will be revealed in us. For the creation waits in eager expectation for the children of God to be revealed.” He knew that death – even his own death – was not going to write the final chapter in his life. Paul had a God-given hope.

You see, hope is a thing with wings that lifts our imaginations from our present reality and into the reality that is to come. As Martin Luther King Jr. said so eloquently, “We must accept finite disappointment, but never lose infinite hope.” Suffering is an inevitable part of life, but for Christians, this world is not all there is. Those things that are wrong in this life are made right in the life to come, according to the scriptures.

In today’s episode, we return to the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou to look at the author’s critique of CRT and the role of transformation.

Episode 264: Robert Chao Romero & Jeff M. Liou – “Christianity and CRT.”

As a child, it always was a little bit embarrassing for me when my mother worked as a substitute teacher for my elementary school class. It wasn’t that my mom was a bad teacher. It was quite the opposite, actually.

My mother was a riveting and dynamic teacher who made learning fun, and as one of the unpopular kids in my class, it always was an awkward moment when kids would come up to me on days that my mom subbed to tell me, “Eric, your mom is so cool!” I wasn’t as cool as my mom – just what every kid wants to hear. Looking back, though, I can easily tell why: my mom was great at reading stories. She made them come to life, changing her voice, reading dynamically, and using her vocal tone to grab every student’s attention so that even the most plain text of the instructions for our homework somehow carried the importance and gravity of an altar call in a Pentecostal church. My mom had a gift for making the written word come alive.

Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M Liou, authors of the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation also make the words of their book come alive in the interview you are about to hear. In this interview, they share their heart not only for the topics in their book, but also for the church and those people who find themselves outside it. I hope you can hear in their words their passion and love for all people, inspired by God and fueled by scripture.

Episode 263: Christianity and CRT – “CRT & The Beloved Community.”

When Senator John Lewis died on July 17, 2020, the New York Times published his letter “Together You Can Redeem the Soul of Our Nation” which he had written three days before his death as his last address to the nation. In this letter, he talked about his hopes for the beloved community, which he strove to build since meeting Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.

Here is a portion of the letter:
… I heard the voice of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on an old radio. He was talking about the philosophy and discipline of nonviolence. He said we are all complicit when we tolerate injustice. He said it is not enough to say it will get better by and by. He said each of us has a moral obligation to stand up, speak up and speak out. When you see something that is not right, you must say something. You must do something. Democracy is not a state. It is an act, and each generation must do its part to help build what we called the Beloved Community, a nation and world society at peace with itself.
Ordinary people with extraordinary vision can redeem the soul of America by getting in what I call good trouble, necessary trouble.

…Though I am gone, I urge you to answer the highest calling of your heart and stand up for what you truly believe.

So this week our team of Christian antiracist educators and friends go back into the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou to talk about the beloved community, a theological idea full of hope and justice.

CREDITS:
Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

Episode 262: Christianity and CRT – “Institutional Colorblindness.”

When you enter a space what percentage of people in that space need to look like you in order for you to feel comfortable? Sometimes for me that number is one, but only if I’m with the right people.

As a white man married to a Chinese woman, I remember some of the first times where I was aware that I was the only white person in a place. I remember standing out. I remember people being curious about me – especially when it came time to eat – to see if I would like eating the traditional Chinese foods my wife’s family enjoyed that would be unusual to my rural, white American palette. No one was color-blind to my whiteness. I still carried my white privilege with me in these situations, but I also experienced and adjusted to the fact that when I was with her family, my cultural ways of doing things were considered, but not centered. If I was to be a part of this family, I needed to figure out how to adapt and learn do things in Chinese ways, while still being myself. I’ve learned to appreciate new foods, new manners, new ways of decision-making, family structures, and ways of resolving conflict. Sometimes the way I see things offers a unique perspective, while other times sitting back and listening to what others say is really much better, as I can learn from what others think. Because they are not colorblind in the way they treat me, I know I am loved for who I am. And because I am not colorblind with them, I am growing too. I’m not where I’ve started from, and I’m still learning to this day.

While my Chinese family is not colorblind to me, some institutions do the exact opposite by adopting a colorblind policy when it comes to diversity efforts, as if not talking about it somehow is a way to treat everyone fairly and equally… but ask many people who study these kinds of programs and the evidence is that these kinds of policies end up being quite hurtful to people of color or other people with diverse backgrounds. We are going to talk about how Christian institutions in particular – like churches, Christian Educational Institutions or Christian social outreach programs – can recognize the pitfalls of institutional colorblindness, so they don’t perpetuate these harms, and look at an example from scripture that is the antidote to these kinds of structural maladies.

So this week our team of Christian antiracist educators and friends jump back into the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou to talk about this pertinent topic!

CREDITS:
Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

Episode 261: Christianity and CRT – “Responding to Demographic Change.”

In 1958, Mildred and Richard Loving were arrested in Virginia for being an interracial couple.
They fought back against their arrest, and their case, Loving vs. Virginia eventually reached the Supreme Court. They won their case on June 12th, 1967 – nine years after their arrest. This case overturned decades of laws against interracial marriage whose roots went back to slave codes created during the colonial era. Their story, and memorable last name, Loving, is why June 12th is now called “Loving Day” in the US – a day now marked to celebrate inter-racial unions. But interracial unions were not always celebrated. At the time the Lovings were married, only 3% of all people in the United States were married to someone of a different race, and most Americans did not approve of them. By 2020 the numbers of interracially married couples has now risen to 20%*, and most Americans accept these unions.

The demographics of America are changing, not just because of interracial marriage, but because of birthrates, immigration, and a host of other factors. In short, the United States is rapidly becoming a nation comprised of people of color. And in the Christian community, with every year that goes by believers in the United States are more and more likely to be people of color than white. That means that church youth groups, Christian schools and universities, and even some church denominations respond with reformational dynamism and imagination or shrink back.

So this week our team of Christian antiracist educators and friends resume looking at the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou. We will talk about how institutions, particularly Christian institutions respond to demographic change, and begin to explore how Critical Race Theory could be a helpful tool for responding to these changes.

Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:

* https://www.axios.com/2022/09/07/approval-of-interracial-marriage-america

Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

Episode 260: Christianity and CRT – “Overt and Covert Racism Plus a Little Bit of Hope.”

What is overt and covert about racism?
I remember when I first started learning about racism as a young white man. I grew up in a rural community, had recently joined a multiethnic church, and was doing a lot of reading and making friends with people of color. I was learning a lot about the harm that racism was causing people. For example, I would hear stories of people using racially offensive language, and I’d think to myself, “I’d never use language like that. That’s pretty racist.” But there would be other things that I would hear that people would describe as racist that made me wonder “Is that actually racist?” Stories that later I would describe as employment discrimination or police harassment that at the time I would have though of as “unfortunate situations”. Those “unfortunate situations” many times were examples of covert racism. What was covert about the racism is that they are covert to my white eyes … they were not so covert to my friends of color who were trying to explain their reality to me. For them these things were not hidden at all – they were crystal clear and part of their ordinary experience of living within the racism of America.

So this week our team of Christian antiracist educators and friends resume looking at the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou. We are talking about the ordinariness of racism, and will talk about overt and covert racism today, and end with a conversation about hope.

Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:
Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

The Iceberg of Racism

 

Episode 259: Christianity and CRT – “Sin, Racism and the Avoidance of Guilt.”

What does it mean that racism is ordinary?
Jim Wallace wrote a book a number of years ago called “America’s Original Sin: Racism, White Privilege and the Bridge to a New America” whose title aptly described racism as the sin condition which most profoundly shaped America from the colonial period forward. From this vantage point, it is quite simply that racism is the pervasive atmosphere which we all live and breath while existing in America. This atmosphere for some of us is something we are keenly aware of on an hourly basis because the consequences of not doing so could potentially be life-altering. For others of us like myself, the racism of America is something that fades into the background of our awareness or is something we rarely-if-ever need to think about … because at least for me as a white man, this racist system was created by people who look like me to keep people who look like me comfortable. It is that ordinary.

So this week our team of Christian antiracist educators and friends resume looking at the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou. We are in Chapter 2 and are using it to look at the ordinary sin of racism and what that means for all of us as we move along in our justice journeys.

Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:
Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

Episode 258: Christianity and CRT – “The Impact of CRT Talk.”

In today’s session Jane and Michelle pause from the discussion of the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou to reflect on what they have read. Both Michelle and Jane identify key takeaways from the introduction and first chapter. They also make connections from what they have read to what they have recently experienced. The episode ends with each identifying self-care practices they are using as they read through the book.

Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:
Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

Episode 257: Christianity and CRT – “Who Gets to Be Legally White?”

So I’m a white guy, and I used to never think about my whiteness when I went anywhere, and for sure for sure I never sat around with other white people and talked about our whiteness. I’ve never sat around with other white people and asked, “When was the last time you thought about your whiteness?” or “What was one of the whitest things you’ve done lately?” … though perhaps now that I’m talking about it, maybe I just will do that some time. I’d have to say that a number of years ago I did some digging into the history of racial laws in the United States to learn about the history of immigration laws because I was curious – how did my Dutch ancestors go from thinking of themselves as Dutch to thinking of themselves as white? I had a lot of emotions about what I discovered, and learned a lot about laws that restricted the liberties and freedoms of people of color since before the Revolutionary War in the American colonies. Whiteness was a created thing, as were racial categories and laws based on these created categories that privileged and advantages white people and disadvantaged and punished others.

So today we will explore this topic using the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou in this episode we are calling the “Who Gets to Be Legally White.”

CREDITS:
Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

Episode 256: Christianity and CRT – “Glory and Honor of Nations.”

In the book of Revelations, John is presented with a vision of the end of time when people from around the world are worshiping God in Heaven. The glory and honor of their cultures is present and nothing impure is there … but what exactly is the good stuff about our cultures, and what’s the stuff that isn’t so good? After all, every culture is made up of some pretty amazing things, and if we are honest, some pretty awful things as well. As human beings existing now, whose standards to we use to speculate about what is good and bad about one another’s cultures?

So today we will explore this topic using the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou in this episode we are calling the “Glory and Honor of the Nations.”

Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:
Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

  

Episode 255: Christianity and CRT – “Community and Cultural Wealth.”

As a therapist, I see people who often come to my office who self-identify as “broken.” They may come in making poor eye contact, telling me a story of how they were victimized, or perhaps made some choices they regret. Sometimes they have experienced a long string of disappointing or tragic events that now has sapped their energy and depressed their mood. Many think that other people are doing better than they are doing because of how they feel. This is a very human experience to compare ourselves mentally to someone we think is better off than we are and thinking that we are somehow deficient because we are not prospering like we imagine they are. Therapists who use a strengths perspective, drawing techniques from positive psychology, ask questions like, “When is the problem not happening?” or “Tell me about a time when you coped well with the problem? What was different about that time?”

These kinds of questions often catch people by surprise because the question presupposes that the person has strengths. That is also a deeply human thing – to have resources and abilities that are sometimes overlooked. It has been my experience as a therapist that many people find confidence and motivation once they begin to perceive themselves as capable of making changes in their life, something that seems impossible when constantly comparing to people you think are better off.

A similar thing is true when it comes to communities. For many years, it was standard practice for white communities to view their culture as superior, and to try to assimilate people of color into it. They viewed other cultures and other racial groups as inferior, and even if they would not use that same language overtly today, this deficit model still is alive and active today. A Biblical worldview (which happens to be well-articulated through the language of CRT) sees communities of color through a strenghths-based perspective as communities with intrinsic worth – worth which they can articulate and categorize as you will see in today’s episode.

So today we will explore this topic using the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou.

Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:
Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

 

Episode 254: Christianity and CRT – “Who Gets to Tell the Story?”

I have a lot of fond childhood memories listening to my uncles and grandpa tell fishing stories. Almost always, the stories seemed to be larger-than-life adventures full of excitement and laughter as they reenacted the scenes of reeling in gamefish from the Michigan lakes where they spent weekends together. It seemed, however, that the hero of the story was whichever relative was telling the story. They would have great fun interrupting each other to argue about the many exaggerations and story-telling liberties each of them made as they told the story. In fact, sometimes the story would have to be told by each of them before anyone had any idea of what really happened… and probably no one of them actually told the whole truth anyway. But that was the fun of it – they all told such great fish stories that no one actually cared – it was all about the story, and less about the truth. After all, at the end of the day, they either caught the fish, or it was a story about the one that got away.

But not all stories have such low-stakes. The stories of legal history, for example, are high-stakes stories because knowing these stories is the only hope we have to right long-standing injustices that have plagued our nation – sometimes for hundreds of years. The fruit that has grown from the poisonous tree of some of these laws need to be recognized. This can only happen if people know the story.

In today’s episode we look at the question of who tells the story of the legal history of the United States using the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou.

Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:
Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

 

Episode 253: Christianity and CRT – “Four Founding Tenets of CRT.”

So we have slowly been talking about the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou to understand how these authors see Critical Race Theory as a helpful bridge for Christian witness, theological reflection, and pastoral ministry. In order to do that, it is important to understand what some of the foundational tenets of CRT are.

Today’s episode unpacks four of these core ideas so that listeners can understand a bit more what CRT is, and what these ideas are, that have shaped, as the authors state, four decades of interdisciplinary observations about the impact of culture, ethnicity and race and how they have operated in US history.

Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:
Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

 

Episode 252: Christianity and CRT – “What Exactly Is CRT Anyway?”

Critical Race Theory is in the news a lot these days, but many people don’t exactly know what it is.  I had a conversation just the other day with someone about this. They thought that they knew what it was, and they definitely thought that they were against it… and when we started talking about what it was, they discovered that they really hadn’t understood what it was.  That can easily happen when we haven’t read about something ourselves.  So, in today’s episode, we will delve into what CRT is, using the definition provided in the book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou.

We will talk about how these two Christian authors define Critical Race Theory, and what our team finds helpful about the way they define it, as well as how they talk about the many theories that make up CRT.

CREDITS:

Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou

 

Episode 251: Christianity and CRT – “When Did You First Recognize Structural Racism?”

At our house, we love to go out to eat.  We live in a small city, so we get excited when a new restaurant opens, especially if the chef brings an ethnic flavor to the menu.  But we don’t just eat what some people might consider “ethnic food”, because all food is someone’s ethnic food.  Sometimes our multiethnic family will go to a restaurant where the offerings are classic American dishes derived primarily from European immigrants, and the talk around the table might drift to what it would be like if we re-created the dish at home in OUR kitchen, re-creating the dishes by possibly taking OUT an ingredient or two that we don’t appreciate, and adding a few things to add some new flavors to make the dish – in our opinion – better.

Like deconstructing a recipe to recreate a dish to make it better, Critical Race Theory (known as CRT for short) explores the legacy of race and racism on US law and policy making in the past and present in the hopes of creating a better and more just future for all.

Authors Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou and their book Christianity and Critical Race Theory: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation have written about the intersections of faith and CRT.  Over the next few weeks, we are going to take our time on the Antioch Podcast to walk through this seminal book, talking about its ideas.  This week, we are starting in the opening chapter with the question, “When did you first recognize structural racism?”

Episode 250: The CRT Summer Series – “Let’s Talk About White Privilege”

This is our last week where we are going to take a journey back into our archive to play some of the best recordings the Antioch Podcast has made over the years on the topic of Critical Race Theory, or CRT for short. CRT has been around for a while first as a legal theory, and then as an influence in academia at large, but more recently has come into discussions of how elementary, middle and high schools should talk about the complex history of the United States, among other things. It is a topic genuinely at the center of discussions on race and faith, and so, we are bringing to you a multi-week master-class covering what CRT is all about, and ways that Christians in particular might want to think about it.

Now, the reason we are covering these back episodes is because once we finish with this CRT summer series, the Antioch Podcast will be releasing a new series on CRT using the book “CHRISITIANITY AND CRITICAL RACE THEORY: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation” by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou. We are encouraging all listeners to purchase this book and read it so that beginning in August, you will be able to join us on our journey through this thoughtful and well-researched book. You won’t want to miss it.

We will take you today to this conversation recorded in 2021, a recording made just after the January 6 assault on the US Capitol, an episode we called “Christianity and CRT: Let’s Talk About White Privilege.” The original article we discuss in this series by Kelly Hamren: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism and Biblical Ethics referred to in this interview has been taken down. A new link to the article can be found in the show notes for this episode on our website, www.antiochpodcast.org.

Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:

Voices With Ed Stetzer: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism, and Biblical Ethics


Voices With Ed Stetzer: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism, and Biblical EthicsBy Kelly Hamren

Episode 249: The CRT Summer Series – “An Interview with Kelly Hamren on CRT”

For the next few weeks, we are going to take a journey back into our archive to play some of the best recordings the Antioch Podcast has made over the years on the topic of Critical Race Theory, or CRT for short. CRT has been around for a while first as a legal theory, and then as an influence in academia at large, but more recently has come into discussions of how elementary, middle and high schools should talk about the complex history of the United States, among other things. It is a topic genuinely at the center of discussions on race and faith, and so, we are bringing to you a multi-week master-class covering what CRT is all about, and ways that Christians in particular might want to think about it.

Now, the reason we are covering these back episodes is because once we finish with them in August, the Antioch Podcast will be releasing a new series on CRT using the book “CHRISITIANITY AND CRITICAL RACE THEORY: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation” by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou. We are encouraging all listeners to purchase this book and read it so that beginning in August, you will be able to join us on our journey through this thoughtful and well-researched book. You won’t want to miss it.

We will take you today to this conversation recorded in 2021, a recording made just after the January 6 assault on the US Capitol, an episode we called Christianity and Critical Race Theory: An Interview with Dr. Kelly Harmen on Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism and Biblical Ethics. The original article we discuss in this series by Kelly Hamren: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism and Biblical Ethics referred to in this interview has been taken down. A new link to the article can be found in the show notes for this episode on our website, www.antiochpodcast.org.

CREDITS:

Voices With Ed Stetzer: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism, and Biblical Ethics

Voices With Ed Stetzer: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism, and Biblical EthicsBy Kelly Hamren

Episode 248: The Summer CRT Series – “BLM and Traditional Biblical Sexuality”

For the next few weeks, we are going to take a journey back into our archive to play some of the best recordings the Antioch Podcast has made over the years on the topic of Critical Race Theory, or CRT for short. CRT has been around for a while first as a legal theory, and then as an influence in academia at large, but more recently has come into discussions of how elementary, middle and high schools should talk about the complex history of the United States, among other things. It is a topic genuinely at the center of discussions on race and faith, and so, we are bringing to you a multi-week master-class covering what CRT is all about, and ways that Christians in particular might want to think about it.

Now, the reason we are covering these back episodes is because once we finish with them in August, the Antioch Podcast will be releasing a new series on CRT using the book “CHRISITIANITY AND CRITICAL RACE THEORY: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation” by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou. We are encouraging all listeners to purchase this book and read it so that beginning in August, you will be able to join us on our journey through this thoughtful and well-researched book. You won’t want to miss it.

We will take you today to this conversation recorded in 2021, a recording made around the time of the January 6 assault on the US Capitol, an episode we called Christianity and Critical Race Theory: BLM and Traditional Biblical Sexuality. The original article we discuss in this series by Kelly Hamren: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism and Biblical Ethics has been taken down. A new link to the article can be found in the show notes for this episode on our website, www.antiochpodcast.org. Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:

Voices With Ed Stetzer: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism, and Biblical EthicsBy Kelly Hamren

Episode 247: The CRT Summer Series – “Marxism and Biblical Justice”

For the next few weeks, we are going to take a journey back into our archive to play some of the best recordings the Antioch Podcast has made over the years on the topic of Critical Race Theory, or CRT for short. CRT has been around for a while first as a legal theory, and then as an influence in academia at large, but more recently has come into discussions of how elementary, middle and high schools should talk about the complex history of the United States, among other things. It is a topic genuinely at the center of discussions on race and faith, and so, we are bringing to you a multi-week master-class covering what CRT is all about, and ways that Christians in particular might want to think about it.

Now, the reason we are covering these back episodes is because once we finish with them in August, the Antioch Podcast will be releasing a new series on CRT using the book “CHRISITIANITY AND CRITICAL RACE THEORY: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation” by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou. We are encouraging all listeners to purchase this book and read it so that beginning in August, you will be able to join us on our journey through this thoughtful and well-researched book. You won’t want to miss it.

We will take you today to this conversation recorded in 2020, an episode we called Christianity and Critical Race Theory: Marxism and Biblical Justice. The original article we discuss in this series by Kelly Hamren: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism and Biblical Ethics has been taken down. A new link to the article can be found in the shownotes for this episode on our website, www.antiochpodcast.org. Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:

Voices With Ed Stetzer: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism, and Biblical Ethics By Kelly Hamren

Episode 246: The CRT Summer Series – “Individual and Systemic Sin.”

For the next few weeks, we are going to take a journey back into our archive to play some of the best recordings the Antioch Podcast has made over the years on the topic of Critical Race Theory, or CRT for short. CRT has been around for a while first as a legal theory, and then as an influence in academia at large, but more recently has come into discussions of how elementary, middle and high schools should talk about the complex history of the United States, among other things. It is a topic genuinely at the center of discussions on race and faith, and so, we are bringing to you a multi-week master-class covering what CRT is all about, and ways that Christians in particular might want to think about it.

Now, the reason we are covering these back episodes is because once we finish with them in August, the Antioch Podcast will be releasing a new series on CRT using the book “CHRISITIANITY AND CRITICAL RACE THEORY: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation” by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou. We are encouraging all listeners to purchase this book and read it so that beginning in August, you will be able to join us on our journey through this thoughtful and well-researched book. You won’t want to miss it.

We will take you today to this conversation recorded in 2020, an episode we called Christianity and Critical Race Theory: Individual and Systemic Sin. The original article by Kelly Hamren: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism and Biblical Ethics has been taken down. A new link to the article can be found in the shownotes for this episode on our website, www.antiochpodcast.org. Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.

CREDITS:

Voices With Ed Stetzer: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism, and Biblical EthicsBy Kelly Hamren

Episode 245: The CRT Summer Series – “Understanding Social Justice.”

For the next few weeks, we are going to take a journey back into our archive to play some of the best recordings the Antioch Podcast has made over the years on the topic of Critical Race Theory, or CRT for short. CRT has been around for a while first as a legal theory, and then as an influence in academia at large, but more recently has come into discussions of how elementary, middle and high schools should talk about the complex history of the United States, among other things. It is a topic genuinely at the center of discussions on race and faith, and so, we are bringing to you a multi-week master-class covering what CRT is all about, and ways that Christians in particular might want to think about it.

Now, the reason we are covering these back episodes is because once we finish with them in August, the Antioch Podcast will be releasing a new series on CRT using the book “CHRISITIANITY AND CRITICAL RACE THEORY: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation” by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou. We are encouraging all listeners to purchase this book and read it so that beginning in August, you will be able to join us on our journey through this thoughtful and well-researched book. You won’t want to miss it.

We will take you today to this conversation recorded in 2020, an episode we called Christianity and Critical Race Theory: Understanding Social Justice. The original article by Kelly Hamren: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism and Biblical Ethics has been taken down. A new link to the article can be found in the shownotes for this episode on our website, www.antiochpodcast.org. Let’s go now and listen, to this conversation.


CREDITS:

Voices With Ed Stetzer: Social Justice, Critical Race Theory, Marxism, and Biblical EthicsBy Kelly Hamren

Episode 244: The CRT Summer Series: “What’s the Problem With CRT?”

For the next few weeks, we are going to take a journey back into our archive to play some of the best recordings the Antioch Podcast has made over the years on the topic of Critical Race Theory, or CRT for short. CRT has been around for a while first as a legal theory, and then as an influence in academia at large, but more recently has come into discussions of how elementary, middle and high schools should talk about the complex history of the United States, among other things. It is a topic genuinely at the center of discussions on race and faith, and so, we are bringing to you a multi-week master-class covering what CRT is all about, and ways that Christians in particular might want to think about it.

Now, the reason we are covering these back episodes is because once we finish with them in August, the Antioch Podcast will be releasing a new series on CRT using the book “CHRISITIANITY AND CRITICAL RACE THEORY: A Faithful and Constructive Conversation” by Robert Chao Romero and Jeff M. Liou. We are encouraging all listeners to purchase this book and read it so that beginning in August, you will be able to join us on our journey through this thoughtful and well-researched book. You won’t want to miss it.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation from 2022, and episode we called What’s the Problem With CRT: A Conversation About Faith Fear and Racial Justice: