Episode 190 “Talking About Race Across the Generations.”

Maybe you can relate to this. You want to talk about something deep, something important with someone of a different generation than you. You love them, you love them a LOT. But you also realize that you are pretty different in a lot of ways as well. You like different music, get information from different places, use different terms, maybe even care about different causes or political ideologies. You might even read the same Bible, but interpret it differently … and can’t see how something that is so clear to you can be so difficult for another person to see. But you want to have this conversation … and it seems to go nowhere. You get stuck in the same place each time, or are turned off by one another’s language, one another’s progressivism or conservatism, or the sense that in the conversation you start to devalue one another.

In the past few years, the nation has become increasingly polarized. Important conversations aren’t happening. It affects churches, social circles, and families… often along generational lines. Some of these conversations are about race, some are about justice, and some are about just about responding to the changing world. Some of us don’t think that people are changing fast enough, and others of us don’t want it to change as fast … or maybe change back to the way things were before, or change because we have new information now that we didn’t have before. There is a lot of complexity.

These intergenerational conversations are increasingly needed and increasingly rare. Our team of antiracism educators and friends talk candidly about how we experience these conversations in our conversation that we want to share with all of you.

Episode 189: What’s The Problem With CRT? – “A Conversation About Fear, Faith and Racial Justice.”

There are a lot of things in the news lately about justice.  Seems like about every other week there is something – some new insult, a new threat, a fresh tragedy – that makes headlines and fill our social media feeds with something to get upset about.  It can be emotionally overwhelming and over time, exhausting. 

One of the many things that has made headlines more and more often is Critical Race Theory, or CRT for short.  More and more institutions and legislators are pushing back against CRT, “wokeness” and talk of racial injustice as if there is a general understanding that CRT is this bad thing that needs to be exterminated from public life.  But how many people really understand what CRT is… or how many people assume they know what it is, because they heard that it was dangerous from someone whose opinion matters to them?  What’s the problem with CRT? 

This is the question that prompted today’s Antioch Podcast conversation.  It was a conversation we had live in a webinar in conjunction with the YWCA’s annual Stand Against Racism event.  This year, the Antioch Podcast was honored to speak at this event in conjunction with our partners at Calvin University and the Christian Reformed Church of North America’s Office of Race Relations.  This 90-minute conversation is what we are about to share with you now.  Resources mentioned in this podcast, including our prior 5-part Antioch Podcast series on CRT – which we mention, can be found in the links on the episode page for this podcast.

The first voice you will hear is Idella Winfield, a staff member of the CRCNA’s Office of Race Relations, who opened up this presentation.

 


CREDITS:

THE ANTIOCH PODCAST MINISERIES CHRISTIANITY & CRT (With Study Guides)
Episode 115 Christianity & CRT – Understanding Social Justice
Episode 116 Christianity & CRT – Understanding Systemic Sin
Episode 117 Christianity & CRT – Understanding Marxism and Biblical Justice
Episode 119 Christianity & CRT – BLM & Traditional Biblical Sexuality
Episode 121 Christianity & CRT – An Interview With Dr. Kelly Hamren, Author of Understanding Critical Race Theory, Marxism and Biblical Ethics

 

PEOPLE OF COLOR who are CHRISTIAN AUTHORS AND INFLUENCERS

Robert Chao Romero – author of The Brown Church; co-author of Christianity and Critical Race Theory

Christina Edmondson – co-author of Faithful Antiracsm and co-host of Truth’s Table podcast

Lisa Sharon Harper – author of The Very Good Gospel and Fortune

Esau McCauley – author of Reading While Black

Natasha Robinson – author of A Sojourner’s Truth and Voices of Lament

Dante Stewart – author of Shouting’ in the Fire

Jemar Tisby – author of The Color of Compromise, How to Fight Racism, and founder of The Witness: A Black Christian Collective

Rich Villodas – author of the Deeply Formed Life

 

Other authors mentioned in this episode:

Ibram X Kendi – author of Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

Mark T. Mulder – author of Shades of White Flight: Evangelical Congregations and Urban Departure

 

Organizations mentioned in this episode:

CORR: Communities Organizing for Racial Equity https://www.corrnow.org

 

Additional Antioch-Related Antiracism Efforts:

The Ripple Consulting Pilot Cohort is a six month virtual cohort designed for white Community Leaders, Educators, Spiritual Leaders, and DEIB+ (Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging) Advocates to grow in awareness of the internalization process that has resulted from systemic racism. Bimonthly sessions include teaching, large and small group discussions, and inter-faith experientials.

Susie Dixon, one of our co-hosts will be co-facilitating the cohort. Go to https://forms.gle/wWujc6D3Tmjqc3WL8 for more information.

 

Episode 188: Not Today. – “Conversations We Can’t Handle Right Now.”

Here’s the situation.  You are minding your business, and someone comes up and asks you a question … one of those kinds of questions.  The kind because you are a person of color, or because you are interested in matters of race and justice, or because you are just you.  It doesn’t matter why exactly but you are put on the spot and asked your opinion on an issue having to do with racism, racial justice, or another potentially controversial topic having to do with your racial or ethnic identity or other diversity characteristics. 

You feel your heart jump, your stomach drop, and your mind is racing.  Perhaps the question is offensive.  You might wonder if the person knows that it is offensive, or whether or not you should let them know that.  Maybe the person asking has a reputation for asking those kind of “gotcha” questions, or just wants you to confirm their bias, political beliefs, or worldview that you really don’t agree with.  Or maybe to answer the question you would need to share that you deeply disagree with them, and you would rather just preserve the relationship and not talk about something that will put that in jeopardy.  Maybe you have been hurt in the past by someone who asked this same question, and now you are bracing to be hurt again.  Deep down you know you will never really know their motive for asking the question, but you probably are trying to guess what it is, though. 

And at the same time, you are wondering, “Do I have energy for this right now?”  If some racial tragedy was just in the news, you might already be feeling worn down and would like nothing more than to save what remaining strength you have to finish out the day and go home to rest.  But… you can’t because you were stopped by this person asking you this question.  Your mind goes from racing to paralyzingly blank … and the only thing registering is the thought, “Not today…”

If you are a person of color, or someone who is interested in antiracism, this scenario isn’t hypothetical.  It happens, for some people it happens frequently.  It is the thing we on the Antioch Podcast talk about off mic often, which is why we decided to have an on-mic conversation about “those” conversations with all of you.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation. 

Episode 187: Should I Stay Or Should I Go? – “Counting the Cost of Belonging.”

In the past 2 years of so, many Americans have quit one job and taken another job … a phenomenon being called “The Great Resignation.” For some, a part of this calculation had to do with the toll their jobs had on their finances, mental health, and sense of safety. But this is an antiracism podcast, so let’s talk about the racial implications of the great resignation. Many racial justice advocates have been asking questions of themselves and their institutions about whether the cost of belonging at their institution was a price they were willing to pay any longer – especially if the institutions they worked for were not advocating for systemic or antiracist policies to improve the lives of their employees and care more justly for the communities or congregations they serve. For many, it is a matter of calculating how much influence they have against the work left to do. When is staying helpful, because you are influencing change, and when does belonging become complicity in a system that is harming some people? What if that system is your faith community, denomination, or church? Should we stay, or should we go?

These are important questions, which we are about to get into, in today’s episode among our team of Christian antiracism educators and friends.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

Episode 186: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Community.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we are in the final episode of our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices.

Our team gathered today to talk about the antiracist spiritual practice of being in community. Our team of six Christian antiracism educators and friends is one such community… but community is much broader, spanning such diverse communities as congregations, organizations, and friends. Three of our usual contributors gathered to talk about how being part of spiritually-forming communities is an essential part of each of our antiracist spiritual practices.

Episode 185.2: Patrick Lyoya – “Race and Policing in the City of Churches.”

This is a special episode of the Antioch Podcast: Conversations About Biblical Antiracsim.

On Monday, April 4th, Patrick Loyoya, a black man who immigrated from the Congo, was shot by a white police officer here in Grand Rapids, Mi – the city where this podcast is recorded. The struggle occurred following a traffic stop for improper tags on his license plate. Our city is reeling. There are protests in the streets and barricades around the police station in the center of the city. This incident today is the lead story on the national news. And it is Holy Week. We recorded this episode on Good Friday – when we remember the death of Jesus at the hands of the Roman government.

There is this hypothetical situation that many of us have asked over the years as so many black men and women, have died in very public ways at the hands of police across the nation. This hypothetical question is, “What would we do if this happened in our city?” That moment is now for those of us here … and because we wanted to share our conversation with all of you, today’s conversation is being released with minimal editing as you will hear us process in real time, our thoughts and feelings about this tragic event.

Episode 185: Antiracist Spiritual Practices: Preaching.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we continue our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices. Spiritual practices form us as believers to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul mind and strength and love our neighbor as ourselves. Practicing antiracism is one of those ways in which we love our neighbor. The spiritual disciplines in this series are classic, spiritual disciplines to be sure, and our team talks about how these classic disciplines can help us practice racial justice and equity in ways solidly grounded in scripture.

Today our team gathered to talk about antiracist preaching. Our team is comprised of quite a number of pastors and preachers … pretty much everyone on the team except me, which is great because they know what they are talking about in this conversation you are about to hear.

Episode 184: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Communion Part 2.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we continue our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices. Spiritual practices form us as believers to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul mind and strength and love our neighbor as ourselves. Practicing antiracism is one of those ways in which we love our neighbor. The spiritual disciplines in this series are classic, spiritual disciplines to be sure, and our team talks about how these classic disciplines can help us practice racial justice and equity in ways solidly grounded in scripture.

Today’s conversation is the second of two conversations we had on communion. In these conversations, we talk about inclusion, representation, community, and forgiveness – all within a historically Biblical context. This is a fascinating conversation that I am excited for you to hear.

Episode 183: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Communion Part 1.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we continue our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices. Spiritual practices form us as believers to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul mind and strength and love our neighbor as ourselves. Practicing antiracism is one of those ways in which we love our neighbor. The spiritual disciplines in this series are classic, spiritual disciplines to be sure, and our team talks about how these classic disciplines can help us practice racial justice and equity in ways solidly grounded in scripture.

Today’s conversation is the first of two conversations we had on communion. In these conversations, we talk about inclusion, representation, community, and forgiveness – all within a historically Biblical context. This is a fascinating conversation that I am excited for you to hear.

Episode 182: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Tithing and Giving Part 2.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we continue our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices. Spiritual practices form us as believers to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul mind and strength and love our neighbor as ourself. Practicing antiracism is one of those ways in which we love our neighbor. The spiritual disciplines in this series are classic, spiritual disciplines to be sure, and our team talks about how these classic disciplines can help us practice racial justice and equity in ways solidly grounded in scripture.

Today’s conversation is the second of two conversations on tithing and giving. We pick up where we left off last week and talk about pay equity, how money affects individuals and institutions, and end with a lengthy discussion of the unseen cost of emotional labor. You are not going to want to miss a minute of this conversation about money and meaning.

Episode 181: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Tithing & Giving Part 1.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we continue our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices. Spiritual practices form us as believers to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul mind and strength and love our neighbor as ourself. Practicing antiracism is one of those ways in which we love our neighbor. The spiritual disciplines in this series are classic, spiritual disciplines to be sure, and our team talks about how these classic disciplines can help us practice racial justice and equity in ways solidly grounded in scripture.

Today’s conversation is the first of two conversations on tithing and giving. You won’t want to miss a minute of what turned out to be a lively conversation…. Ok, I want to tell you more, but I’m not going to give any spoilers.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

 

 

Episode 180: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Lent & Crowding Out Jesus.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we talk about what the Lenten season means, how we each practice it, and reflect on how practicing Lenten disciplines has shaped our faith journeys as Christians. This is a conversation full of good questions, which we hope, cause you to reflect as well during this holy season.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

 

 

CREDITS:

Donna Barber: Bread for the Resistance: Forty Devotions for Justice People

Gary Zimak: Give Up Worry for Lent: 40 days to Finding Peace in Christ

Shekinah Glory Ministry – Yes

Episode 179 “Reflections on Black History Month.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, members of our team take a break from our series on Spiritual Disciplines to reflect on Black History Month. Members of our team share their thoughts on the meaning of the observance for them personally, as well as, for the nation and church. Their conversation draws connections between the past and present concern of “erasing” the Black experience and racism from history books, the church, and our collective memory. Together the team asserts that a continued engagement with history is essential to provide context for the present.

 

Episode 178: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Worship.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we are resuming the Antiracist Spiritual Practices series we started a few months ago.  In this series, our team has conversations about how Christian spiritual practices form and inform ways of living as Biblical antiracists.  This week our conversation turned to worship.  Author Temi Peters writes in her book Instruments of Praise & Acts of Worship, “God is not looking for incredibly high notes, intricate riffs or award-winning ad-libbing.  God is looking at the heart.”  Our conversation this week took this to heart, as we talked about what is at the heart of worship.

 

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation. 

 

Episode 177: An Antioch Podcast Encore – “Racial Reconciliation Reluctance.”

A recent Lifeway Research study on the American church was released this past week. The study revealed that more pastors believe that they would receive pushback if they spoke on the topic of racial reconciliation than they would have the year before the Trump presidency. While it is true that white Evangelical Christians voted for Donald Trump at rates higher than white Americans in general, it is noteworthy that this now seems to correlate with an increased sense that preaching on the Biblical topic of racial reconciliation is less welcome than it has been in the recent past.

Our team had a few thoughts about this which you’ll hear when you listen.

 

 

CREDITS:

CT News January 2021: Pastors More Reluctant to Preach on Race, Lifeway Research

Photo Gallery: “What would be the title of your autobiography?”

E

Episode 176: Susie Dixon – “Addressing Racism in the Roots.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we are continuing our series where each member of the Antioch Podcast team takes a turn sharing a bit about our antiracism journey over the past year.  This week, Susie Dixon shares her story.  Susie, in addition to being a regular co-host on the Antioch Podcast , now leads antiracism workshops after working in both mono-ethnic and multiethnic churches and Christian institutions over the years.  Her reflections are full of power, truth, and a there might be a few times that if you are thinking about what she is saying – you might say, “I see myself here.”

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation. 

 

CREDITS:

 

The Antioch Podcast Team’s Antiracism Podcast Antiracism “Friend Crushes.”:

Eric: Joe Kuilema

Libby: Shelie Wise Rowe

Susie: The person who speaks first about injustice

Jane: Jemar Tisby

Reggie: Martin Luther King

Episode 175: Jane Bruin – “A TCK in COVID Time.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we are continuing our series where each member of the Antioch Podcast team takes a turn sharing a bit about our antiracism journey over the past year.  This week, Jane Bruin is sharing her story.  She gives context to her story as someone who identifies as a third culture kid – or “TCK” for short, before going into the story of her antiracism journey during the time of COVID.

 

CREDITS:

The Antioch Podcast Team’s Antiracism Podcast Recommendations:

Eric: Disruptive Peacemakers

Libby: Invisibilia: Friendship Series

Susie: Faith Improvised

Jane: Truth’s Table

          Pass the Mic

 

 

Episode 174: Michelle Loyd Paige – “From Alignment to Reimagining.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we are continuing our series where each member of the Antioch Podcast team takes a turn sharing a bit about our antiracism journey over the past year. This week, Michelle will be sharing her story. Michelle carries many titles – she is a professor, a preacher, a PhD and on this podcast, a person we on the get to know and call a friend. She sat down to talk with our team about her antiracism journey this past year, telling us all about how this was a year focusing on alignment – a word she prayerfully set with God to give her focus during what turned out to be a momentous year.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

CREDITS:

The Antioch Podcast Team’s Antiracism Music Recommendations:

Michelle: Hezakiah Walker – “I Need You To Survive”

Jane: Mr. Wendall – Arrested Development

Reggie: Marvin Gay – What’s Goin’ On?

Eric: Lift Every Voice and Sing – (Kirk Franklin)

Episode 173: Reggie Smith – “Daughters, Mother, Son.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we are continuing our series where each member of the Antioch Podcast team takes a turn sharing a bit about our antiracism journey over the past year.  This week, Pastor Reggie Smith will be sharing his story of his journey over the last year in this episode we are calling “Daughters, Mother, Son.” 

 

CREDITS:

The Antioch Podcast Team’s Antiracism Book Recommendations:

Michelle:

Diversity Playbook – Michelle Loyd Paige and Michelle Williams

Becoming Brave – Brenda Salter McNeil

Libby:

Octavia Butler “Parable of the Sower” series

Jane:

The Color of Law – Richard Rothstein

Reggie:

Race and Reunion, David Blight

Robert E Lee and Me – Ty Seidule

 

Think Again, Adam Grant

Eric:

The Next Evangelicalism, Soong-Chan Rah

The Color of Compromise, Jemar Tisby

How to Fight Racism, Jemar Tisby

Episode 172: Eric Nykamp – “Comfort and Complicity.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we are starting a new series where each member of the Antioch Podcast team takes a turn sharing a bit about our antiracism journey over the past year.  This week, it is my turn to share my story.  I’ve not shared my story on the podcast before, and this is only a bare-bones version, but I hope you the listener find it meaningful. 

 

CREDITS:

The Antioch Podcast Team’s Antiracism Movie Recommendations:

 

 

Episode 171: One Year Later … “Remembering the Insurrection.”

Sometimes I have a hard time dating forms after New Year’s Day. It is like my brain is on autopilot, and it takes me a good while to remember the year correctly. But not in 2021. On January 1st of 2021, I couldn’t wait to put all the awfulness of 2020 behind. I was so happy writing the number 2021 when I had to sign and date forms. After 9 months of pandemic lockdowns, racial unrest, and a contentious election, I was ready to put the past year behind me. I was convinced that 2021 had to be a better year… and then January 6 happened. I remember that sense that things were bound to get better evaporate as I watched the scenes of insurrectionists overrunning the US Capitol Building. I know I’m not alone.

So today on the Antioch Podcast, our multiracial team of antiracism educators and friends sat down to talk about our memories of that day a year ago, talking about what we thought and felt at the time, and how we are thinking today about these events a year later.

This was a particularly vulnerable conversation … which we are willing to share with all of you, our listeners.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

CREDITS:

Moca Valencia Recipe

Golden Statue of Trump

Gold Statue CPAC

 

Episode 170: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Self-Care”

Today we are continuing our miniseries on the Antioch Podcast on Antiracist Spiritual Practices – the same Christian disciplines that Christians have been practicing for over two millennia, with an Antiracism focus. Biblical Antiracism swings the camera of our awareness to examine how sin-filled humans use their power to create systems and policies which many times bring about racial inequities and injustice. These systemic injustices make it hard for all peoples to flourish, which is not in keeping with God’s plan for humanity. These spiritual practices accomplish three things:

1.) These spiritual practices heighten our individual and corporate awareness to perceive and recognize individual and systemic sins that lead to inequity and injustice – including racial inequities and race-based injustices.
2.) These spiritual disciplines prepare us for action because as it says in the book of James chapter 2:17 -faith without actions is dead.
3.) These spiritual disciplines make room for us to be filled with the Holy Spirit, who stretches and guides us as we walk by faith. We remember that it was the Holy Spirit who called the church out of a Jewish monoculture to a worldwide faith reaching all peoples and cultures of the Roman world… a phenomenon which continues to this day. Without the work of the Spirit, there would be no multiethnic church – as our sinful human nature is to be self-centered, stay in our own groups, and hoard whatever resources and power we have to serve our own interests.

So today, we continue with a discussion of the antiracist spiritual practice of self-care. Jesus routinely would take time away from ministry to recharge – often in solitary places. This practice of self-care is the topic of our discussion today because racism takes a toll on anyone who is working to recover from the damage of overt racism and microaggressions, decolonize their mind, have equitable relationships, and reform systems and institutions to be more inclusive places where all God’s people can live and thrive.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

Episode 169: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Scripture Reading”

Today we are starting another miniseries on the Antioch Podcast on Antiracist Spiritual Practices.  These are the same Christian disciplines that Christians have been practicing for over two millennia, with an Antiracism focus.  Biblical Antiracism swings the camera of our awareness to examine how sin-filled humans use their power to create systems and policies which many times bring about racial inequities and injustice.  These systemic injustices make it hard for all peoples to flourish, which is not in keeping with God’s plan for humanity.  These spiritual practices accomplish three things:

  • These spiritual practices heighten our individual and corporate awareness to perceive and recognize individual and systemic sins that lead to inequity and injustice – including racial inequities and race-based injustices.
  • These spiritual disciplines prepare us for action because as it says in the book of James chapter 2:17 -faith without actions is dead.
  • These spiritual disciplines make room for us to be filled with the Holy Spirit, who stretches and guides us as we walk by faith. We remember that it was the Holy Spirit who called the church out of a Jewish monoculture to a worldwide faith reaching all peoples and cultures of the Roman world… a phenomenon which continues to this day.  Without the work of the Spirit, there would be no multiethnic church – as our sinful human nature is to be self-centered, stay in our own groups, and hoard whatever resources and power we have to serve our own interests.

So today, we continue with a discussion of the antiracist spiritual practice of reading scripture.  As you will hear, there are a few “drop the mic” moments in this episode.  Well worth a second, and perhaps a third listen.

 

Episode 168: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Prayer”

Today we are starting another miniseries on the Antioch Podcast on Antiracist Spiritual Practices.  These are the same Christian disciplines that Christians have been practicing for over two millennia, with an Antiracism focus.  Biblical Antiracism swings the camera of our awareness to examine how sin-filled humans use their power to create systems and policies which many times bring about racial inequities and injustice.  These systemic injustices make it hard for all peoples to flourish, which is not in keeping with God’s plan for humanity.  These spiritual practices accomplish three things:

  • These spiritual practices heighten our individual and corporate awareness to perceive and recognize individual and systemic sins that lead to inequity and injustice – including racial inequities and race-based injustices.
  • These spiritual disciplines prepare us for action because as it says in the book of James chapter 2:17 -faith without actions is dead.
  • These spiritual disciplines make room for us to be filled with the Holy Spirit, who stretches and guides us as we walk by faith. We remember that it was the Holy Spirit who called the church out of a Jewish monoculture to a worldwide faith reaching all peoples and cultures of the Roman world… a phenomenon which continues to this day.  Without the work of the Spirit, there would be no multiethnic church – as our sinful human nature is to be self-centered, stay in our own groups, and hoard whatever resources and power we have to serve our own interests.

So today, we begin with a discussion of the antiracist spiritual practice of prayer.  It is a passionate conversation, perhaps worth listening to more than once.  Fair warning, there are a few times in this conversation you might say, “ouch.”

CREDITS:

Antiracism Prayer – United Church of Canada

https://www.trinitychurchboston.org/sites/default/files/ART-Prayerbook-FINAL_0.pdf

 

Karl Bart (Barth?) Pray with the Bible in one hand and the newspaper in another.

Episode 167: Antiracism 101 – “What Is Biblical Antiracism?” – part 2

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we are at the end of a three-part miniseries on Antiracism basics, we are calling “Antiracism 101.”  Two episodes back, we explored what antiracism is – and last week we had the first of two-episodes devoted to a discussion of what Biblical antiracism is.

So today, we will finish our two-part discussion of what is Biblical about antiracism.  It’s a good one.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

CREDITS:

Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do, Jennifer L. Eberhardt

Synod repents of the sin of racism

Synod Repents of Historical and Present Racism

The True Courage of Johanna Veenstra

Leading and Longing, Eric Nykamp