Episode 147: Laura Pritchard – “Black Leader/Multiethnic Church.”

Today we are stepping away from our series on the book of Acts to hear the story of Laura Pritchard.  Laura was one of the first African-American leaders at Madison Church, formerly known as Madison Square Church where she served first as a volunteer, and later oversaw youth ministries, outreach, and led worship.  Madison Church is a 100-year old multiethnic church in Grand Rapids, Michigan.  In 2020 Laura left her employment at Madison to be the first African-American missionary in the Christian Reformed Church, called by the denomination to Monrovia, Liberia, where she and her husband do ministry in partnership with Providence Baptist church.  Interestingly, Providence Baptist Church is the church founded by Lot Carey and other Black Americans who left the United States in 1822 to create a colony for free Black people back in Africa.

Before leaving for the mission field, Laura took pains to leave Madison Church well.  One of the ways Laura had served Madison was in starting an antiracism group, known as MART. MART is the acronym that stands for Madison’s Anti-Racism Team.  MART is an official advisory committee to Madison’s council of elders and deacons, who govern the church.  As she was preparing to leave, Laura took an evening to share her story with MART to encourage the team in their work.  In this episode, we will hear this recording of Laura’s story from February 2020.

Episode 146: Radical Acts – “Named.”

As we continue our antiracist reading of the book of Acts, the narrative spotlight now swings from Paul back to Peter, the disciple of Jesus leading the church in exile. We find Peter, now walking among those believed to be of lesser-importance in Jewish culture: a paralyzed man, a group of impoverished widows, a dead woman, and a tanner – whose vocation necessitates that he routinely handle stinking death flesh. Peter centers those on the margins, and in so doing, literally re-enacts these miracles now in the name of Jesus. And he does so in a culturally-intelligent manner, as we are about to see.

Our multiethnic group of antiracism educators and friends had another lively conversation about race, faith, and power as we read scripture together, as you are about to hear.

Let’s go now, and listen to this conversation.

CREDITS:

Willie Jennings Commentary on Acts

You Know My Name – Tasha Cobbs Leonard

Episode 145: White Work – “Understanding Whiteness and Rightness.”

We are taking a momentary break from our Radical Acts series to bring you the audio of the most recent White Work live event put on by the Antioch Podcast and the Office of Race Relations for the Christian Reformed Church of North America.
In this episode, Reggie and Michelle cohost a panel of white Christians who have been on their own antiracism journeys, asking them questions about their perspectives on how white cultural norms govern institutions – often having the effect of silencing voices of people of color, how faith has affected their antiracism journeys, as well as a deep dive into what it means to center whiteness … and perhaps what to do about it.

As usual, these conversations went in a vulnerable direction.

Episode 144: Radical Acts – “Giving Saul the Side-Eye.”

Have you ever had someone flip on you? You know, one day they believe something so strongly, maybe so strongly that they argue about it all the time with anyone who holds a different viewpoint? Then you don’t see that person for a bit and when they come back, they are changed. They had a conversion! You can’t believe what they are saying! The kinds of people they used to argue with – now they sound just like them! It’s unbelievable. You wonder, seriously, if aliens have taken over their body because they are not the person they used to be.
Enter Saul, stage left. The man who used to be a theological bounty hunter, the man who rounded up Jesus followers and had them arrested and even killed … he now is playing for the other team, and going hard after the people who just a little while ago had sanctioned HIM to persecute the people he now is defending.

Is this too good to be true? And if it is, is this guy reliable? Mentally, spiritually? What makes a guy flip like this? Maybe he changed overnight, but those who had been long-haulers for the Jesus Way needed to see if this guy is for real … and that kind of trust can’t be earned overnight. If only he would shut up a second and stop making trouble wherever he goes…
We are going to talk about this story from Acts 9 in this episode, turning our sights on this story from scripture with our regular group of Christian antiracism educators and friends for this episode we are calling “Giving Saul the Side-Eye.”

Let’s go now, and listen to this conversation.

CREDITS:

Julia (NBC television series 1968-1971)
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Julia_(American_TV_series)

Willie Jennings Commentary on Acts https://www.amazon.com/Acts-Theological-Commentary-Bible-Belief/dp/0664234003/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=willie+Jennings+acts&qid=1619815143&sr=8-2

Episode 143: Radical Acts – “Brash, Blind and Brave.”

Remember back a few episodes when we met this guy named Saul who held the coats of the people who wanted to murder Stephen? This episode is about him. He has been out trying to hunt down members of the Jesus Way (known as “the Way”) to kill or capture them. Not a nice guy. God deals with him in a powerful way, but not the way you would expect … or maybe you would. I’ll let you decide.

As is our usual practice, our multiethnic team of Christian antiracism educators and friends take our various antiracism lenses to the text, to tell the story of scripture in marvelous complexity.

Let’s go now, and listen to this conversation.


CREDITS:

Willie Jennings Commentary on Acts https://www.amazon.com/Acts-Theological-Commentary-Bible-Belief/dp/0664234003/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=willie+Jennings+acts&qid=1619815143&sr=8-2

Episode 142 – “Breaking Barriers.”

For those of you who may be new to the podcast, we are a multi-racial group of Christian friends who take an hour each episode to have a conversation about race and faith. In the past few months, we have been doing a deep dive into scripture, to look at the Biblical precedent undergirding Christian antiracism efforts. We have been focusing on the book of Acts, in this series we’ve been calling “Radical Acts: The birth of the multiethnic church.”

So, in today’s episode, we’ve come to the narrative from scripture commonly referred to as “Phillip and the Ethiopian Eunuch.” To set the scene, the early church by this time was just beginning to expand its membership to include outsiders to Judaism – Hellenistic Jews and Samaritans. This act would have been perceived as radical by most Jewish people who had been raised from birth to think of themselves as separate and superior to both of these groups. But these two groups also occupied spaces adjacent to Judaism, which meant that while they may have been warry of one another, they also had practice accommodating one another to a degree.

But God was about to call the church to include people who had increasingly little knowledge of Jewish ethnic or religious practice. In today’s story, Phillip, himself a cultural outsider to Judaism, was beginning to be recognized as the leader of the Jesus way in Samaria. Phillip was making a name for himself by bringing the gospel to the residents of Samaria – a people whose jewish ancestors had intermarried with various tribal groups in centuries past, and now were looked down on by 1st Century Jews for their mixed-blood heritage and watered-down Jewish dietary and religious traditions. Phillip was about to be sent by God from Samaria into the wilderness, along a Roman road that went from Jerusalem to Gaza … where he would meet an Ethiopian governmental official on his way back to Africa from the city of God.

As usual, our team had a lot to say about this, theologically and personally.

Let’s go now, and listen to this conversation.


CREDITS:

Willie Jennings Commentary on Acts https://www.amazon.com/Acts-Theological-Commentary-Bible-Belief/dp/0664234003/ref=sr_1_2?dchild=1&keywords=willie+Jennings+acts&qid=1619815143&sr=8-2

Episode 141: Radical Acts – “What’s Our Price?”

In today’s installment of the Antioch Podcast we continue our series “Radical Acts” the story of the birth of the multiethnic church. In today’s episode, we enter the story as the followers of Jesus flee persecution from Jews. They find shelter among the “half-Jewish” residents of Samaria, whom Jews saw as a lower-caste people. These followers of Jesus begin to reckon with how to reestablish themselves as a movement in this decidedly non-Jewish space, and we watch as a new leader emerges named Phillip, himself an ethic outsider to Judaism. As always, we bring our antiracist lens to our reading of scripture, as we talk about this text.

CREDITS:

Willie Jennings Commentary on Acts

Episode 140: Radical Acts – “The Lost Cause of the Hellenistic Jews.”

In today’s episode we continue our series “Radical Acts” the story of the birth of the multiethnic church.  Last episode we left off with the story of Stephen, the Hellenistic Jew.  Stephen was an “ethnic outsider” to the predominantly ethnically Jewish early church, and once in leadership, he went to share the story of Jesus to his own people – other Hellenistic Jews.

But the story of Jesus challenged the norms of the leaders of the Hellenistic Jews, who saw themselves as exceptional members of their ethnic community who in many ways were “more Jewish than the Jewish Jews” – which was what they believed marked them as insiders within Judaism, despite their obvious differences.  As Libby said last episode, Stephen’s sermon laid out that there was a pattern of the people of God getting messages – from God – and not listening to them.  And when he shared that this story included the Hellenistic Jewish people not following the Holy Spirit in the present day, the people dragged him out and put him to death.

In today’s episode, we take a closer look at the content of Stephen’s sermon, as it was recorded in full in Acts 8.  We look at how the sin condition of the people of God in the first Century is very much like the sin condition of people today, in this episode we are calling “The Lost Cause of the Hellenistic Jews.”

Before we get started, observant listeners may hear the periodic chirping of an unreachable smoke detector whose battery was dying in today’s recording.  Our apologies.  This is the recording, and not the smoke detector in your house.
 

 

Episode 139: Radical Acts – “The Story of Stephen.”

In today’s episode we continue our series “Radical Acts” the story of the birth of the multiethnic church. In today’s installment, we look at the story of Stephen, one of the newly-appointed leaders of the early church. Stephen was a Hellenistic Jew, which in our previous episode we pointed out, meant that he was an ethnic minority in the newly-forming church. The church at this time still considered itself connected to Judaism, but most Jewish leaders were having difficulty perceiving that Jesus was the fulfillment of the prophesies and traditions they had kept for over a thousand years. It is understandably difficult for any institution to adapt to rapid change, and first-century Judaism was no exception.

The story of Stephen is a case in point in looking at how institutions sometimes respond to those who advocate for change. In this episode, we will look at what happened to Stephen, the ethnic outsider, when he begins to share the story of Jesus among the religious leaders of the Hellenistic Jews. Remember, these particular religious leaders were ethnic outsiders to Judaism like himself, who – in spite of their ethnic, cultural and even linguistic differences – still held tightly to the traditional practices and teachings of their Jewish heritage. These leaders emphasized being exceptional members of their institution, and saw Stephen and his message as a threat to the space they had carved out for themselves within the institution of Judaism. As you can imagine, there were fireworks… but don’t take my word for it. Hear it from our team.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

 

 

CREDITS:

Willie Jennings Commentary on Acts

The Stoning of Sorayah M.

Episode 138: Radical Acts – “The Choosing of the Seven.”

In today’s episode we return to our series “Radical Acts” the story of the multiethnic church. We will begin with a little-known story referred to as “the choosing of the seven.” This is a story about how the early church dealt with ethnic divisions, economic injustice, and the use of systemic power to address these concerns. So buckle your theological seatbelts! We are going on a ride!

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

CREDITS:

Willie Jennings Commentary on Acts

The Dance of the Dissident Daughter, Sue Monk Kidd

See No Stranger, Valarie Kaur

Reaching Out, Henri Nouwen

The Gifts of Imperfection, Brené Brown

Episode 137: An Antioch Encore – “Antiracist Inspiration.”

Before we start today’s episode, on behalf of the Antioch Podcast team, I want to thank all of our listeners. The annual Stand Against Racism episode “White Work” has been downloaded and listened to hundreds of times more than any of our previous episodes. We have heard in comments from many of you that you want to hear more episodes like this, and so stay tuned. There will be another live event, White Work 2.0, coming in June, details coming soon.

To all of our new listeners, welcome to the Antioch Podcast, where every week you will get the opportunity to listen in on our multiethnic group of Christian antiracism educators and friends as we have a conversation about Biblical antiracism. When all of us are here, we have two team members who identify as white, two team members who identify as black, and two team members who identify as “middle voices” to capture a limited spectrum of the voices who make up the American racial caste system we all inhabit. No other podcast that we know of talks about faith and race with such a diverse team, and we welcome you to listen in.

Now to our long-time listeners, thank you. Thank you for listening when we were starting out and were small. Thank you for listening when we were finding our voice as we started out, for some of you going back to 2016 when Barack Obama was the president. We didn’t see what was coming, what turned out to be the racial re-awakening that continues to blossom across the United States and in post-colonial spaces all across the globe. As this re-awakening sparked conversations, dialogue and intense emotions in our churches and religious institutions, you listened. As the years continued, we saw that you listened – often more intently – following racial incidents that punctuated the new cycles of the past five years. Thank you for trusting us to be a place that you went to hear honest, thoughtful Christian conversations during these impassioned moments in our nation.

So today, we are going to bring you an Antioch encore, an episode from our archives. For a bit of context, this is an episode from this past fall. We were entering into the winter holidays during the pandemic. The events of the summer of 2020 were still very much on our minds, and we took a moment, in this episode we called “Antiracist Inspiration” to recall the people who inspired us to strive for racial justice during this trying time.

Episode 136: Radical Acts – “Gamaliel the Moderate.”

In today’s episode, we resume our series “Radical Acts”, the story of how the church grew from a monoethnic Jewish sect to a multiethnic religion encompassing the known world.  Today, we have a conversation about the persecution of the early church by leaders of the powerful religious establishment of the day.  To provide a bit of context, followers of Jesus were not yet seen as a separate religion by the Jewish leaders at this point in the story of the early church.  Our conversation centers on one of the Jewish leaders, a Pharisee named Gamaliel, and the speech he gave about how the religious authorities should use their power.  As always, the next hour will be filled with thoughtful commentary, vulnerable storytelling, and end with some challenging ideas.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

 

CREDITS:

Willie Jennings Commentary on Acts

All One Body: Three queer pastors address the question: What does it look like to have a flourishing church and to share the abundant life?

 

 

Episode 135: WHITE WORK – “Antiracism Journeys of White People.”

We are stepping away from our regular series on the book of Acts to bring you the audio from our latest live event, White Work: A Conversation About the Antiracism Journeys of White People. This 90-minute live webinar was recorded on Friday, April 23rd in partnership between the Antioch Podcast and Calvin University, the Christian Reformed Church of North America, and the Grand Rapids chapter of the YWCA. This particular virtual event was the regional 2021 STAND AGAINST RACISM event for the greater Grand Rapids area. STAND AGAINST RACISM events are hosted by the YWCA every year around this time, and it was an honor for the Antioch Podcast Team, and our guests (who have each appeared on the podcast before) to be included in this year’s virtual event.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

CREDITS:

Bell Hooks “All About Love.”

Peter Cha – “Redeeming our Racialized Identities.”

John Biewen SEEING WHITE podcast series

John Biewen SEEING WHITE Ted talk

Willie Jennings WIKIPEDIA

Willie Jennings – The Christian Imagination: Theology and the Origins of Race

Willie Jennings: European Christian Missionaries and Their False Sense of Progress

CORR (Congregations Organizing for Racial Reconciliation) – Race Caucusing and Understanding Racism workshops

Understanding Gaslighting

How Gaslighting Got Its Name

Me and White Supremacy – Layla Saad

Caste by Isabel Wilkerson

Examples of churches with regular, strong, antiracist preaching:

Jemar Tisby: How to Fight Racism: Courageous Christianity and the Journey Toward Racial Justice

The Racial Healing Handbook: Practical Activities to Help You Challenge Privilege, Confront Systemic Racism & Engage in Collective Healing by Anneliese A. Singh PhD, LPC

Episode 134: Radical Acts – “Transformational vs. Transactional Living.”

In today’s episode, we continue our series “Radical Acts”, the story of how the church grew from a monoethnic Jewish sect to a multiethnic religion encompassing the known world. We pick up this episode with a comparison of two stories. The first is a story of how a young follower of the Jesus Way named Barnabas, sold a field and gave all the money to the community. The second is the story of a married couple, Ananias and Saphira, who similarly sold property, keeping part of it for themselves, while telling the disciples that they were donating the entire sale to the community. This story has many things to tell us about our present day, and I won’t spoil anything by telling you that our team had some thoughtful insights to share about how this story has relevance in our racialized world.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

CREDITS:

FREE WEBINAR!
WHITE WORK: the Antiracism Journeys of White People
April 23 from noon-1:30pm EST

The Cold Within – poem by James Patrick Kinney

Episode 133: Radical Acts – “Fixed Mindset/Growth Mindset.”

In today’s episode, we return to our series Radical Acts, the story of how the church grew from a monoethnic Jewish sect to a multiethnic religion that encompassed the known world. We pick up the story in Acts chapter four … but not until we take our time talking about a few stories during our opening question. We take our time getting to the scripture discussion, so hold on – what we talk about in the beginning of the episode informs what we talk about at the end. It’s going to be a great episode.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.


CREDITS:

FREE WEBINAR!
WHITE WORK: the Antiracism Journeys of White People
April 23 from noon-1:30pm EST
https://crcna.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_3zOUZZtPRKGr38mNLedJaw

Episode 132: Empire and the Kingdom of God – “A Power Analysis of the Temple and the Contemporary Church.”

Today’s episode of the Antioch Podcast is titled EMPIRE AND THE KINGDOM OF GOD: A Power Analysis of the Temple and the Contemporary Church, comparing the center and margins of power from the past to the present. Using a power analysis is a useful way to learn who serves and is served by systems and institutions. It also helps us analyze how to be a more just body of Christ. There is an accompanying video of this section of the podcast, which is offered as a free teaching tool. You can view this video on the Antioch Podcast’s YouTube Channel, by following this link:

Empire and the Kingdom of God

To conclude this episode on centers and margins of power, I’d like to share with you an example of someone who changed his perspective as a leader, the recently sainted Catholic Archbishop, Oscar Romero. I read about his story in a recent article written by Kate Kooyman, and asked her if she would share her article with us on the Antioch Podcast.

Kate Kooyman is a minister in the Reformed Church in America, and works at the CRC’s Office of Social Justice. She is s a regular contributor to the Reformed Journal’s blog, and her writing also can be found on her website www.katekooyman.com. Kate often writes about the intersection of faith and politics.

CREDITS:

FREE WEBINAR!

WHITE WORK: the Antiracism Journeys of White People

April 23 from noon-1:30pm EST

https://crcna.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_3zOUZZtPRKGr38mNLedJaw

 

 

 

 

Episode 131: How Could Churches Respond to Incidents of National Racial Violence

Racial violence is, unfortunately, not a new phenomenon in the United States. But the media hasn’t always covered these incidents to the degree that they do now. With the advent of the cell-phone video cameras and social media, now everyday-citizens are able to record incidents of racial violence from their vantage point, and distribute the record of these events with ease to the broader public. This has two effects. On the one hand, these recordings educate the general public about the prevalence and seriousness of racist violence. On the other hand, people of color exposed to the footage often are traumatized by the images.

So how could churches respond? Recent studies show that the American church in general, and majority-white churches in particular, find this topic challenging. While many churches don’t’ talk about race at all, those that do still find it difficult to know how to respond where there are national incidents of racial violence such as the recent shooting of Asian women in Georgia, the rise hate crimes against the AAPI community in the past year, or the numerous racial protests over the past decade in response to the killing of unarmed Black men and women by the police.

Our team gathered around the mics to talk about how churches could respond to national incidents of violence against racialized communities.

 

CREDITS:

FREE WEBINAR!

WHITE WORK: the Antiracism Journeys of White People

April 23 from noon-1:30pm EST

https://crcna.zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_3zOUZZtPRKGr38mNLedJaw

 

 

Episode 130: A Pandemic of Hate Part 2 – “After the Atlanta Mass-Shooting.”

On Tuesday, March 16th, 2021, a white gunman went into 3 Asian Spas in Atlanta, Georgia, massacring a number of staff and patrons, almost all of whom were Asian women. Regular listers will note that we dedicated our last episode to the alarming rise in hate crimes against Asian Americans. We had no idea that the episode would have been so timely. As we have done with regrettably increasing frequency, after a traumatic racial moment in the country, we dedicate an episode to processing together. This time, we invited back our guests, Dr. Pennylyn Dystra Pruim and Dr. Nina Kim Hanson, to talk with us about how we are all responding to these shocking events.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

 

 

CREDITS:

Stop AAPI Hate.org

#Hate Is A Virus

The Muddled History of Anti-Asian Violence by Hsa Hsu

Episode 129: A Pandemic of Hate – “The Alarming Rise of Anti-Asian Violence.”

NOTE: This episode was recorded before the mass-shooting of Asian-American women in Atlanta had occurred.  We will respond to this incident in an upcoming episode.

A year ago in March, then President Donald Trump began describing the emerging COVID-19 pandemic using anti-Asian rhetoric, like “Kung Flu” and “the China virus.”  In the following days, according to the group Stop AAPI Hate, between March 19, 2020 to December 31, 2020, there were over 2,808​ firsthand accounts of anti-Asian hate from 47 states and the District of Columbia.  In 2021 around the Lunar New Year, another spate of anti-Asian hate crime, often perpetrated against elderly Asian-Americans, began being reported.  According to the group #hateisavirus, since the start of the pandemic, hate crimes against Asians and Asian Americans have spiked 1900% from the previous year.  Most Americans, however, are unaware of this.  Most American churches, including many multiethnic churches where Asian and Asian Americans worship, also have not mentioned this alarming rise in hate-crimes as a matter for prayer.

This week, the regular members of the Antioch Podcast Team gathered along with several guests to talk about why this is happening, and how congregations  – and Christians of all races –  can respond.

CREDITS:

Stop AAPI Hate.org

#Hate Is A Virus

The Muddled History of Anti-Asian Violence by Hsa Hsu

8 People Shot To Death At Atlanta-Area Massage Parlors; Man Arrested – NPR

 

 

 

 

Episode 128: Radical Acts – “Look At Us.”

In today’s episode we return to our series Radical Acts, a story of how the early church transformed from a monoethnic religious sect to a multiethnic and multicultural religious movement. In today’s episode, we look at the story in the third chapter of Acts, which opens up with two of Jesus’ disciples, Peter and John interact with a man who was forced to beg in the temple court to support himself, since he was born unable to walk.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.


CREDITS:

Coal Black and the Sebben Dwarfs
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coal_Black_and_de_Sebben_Dwarfs

When Diversity Isn’t Enough by Korrie Little Edwards
https://www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2021/march/race-diversity-multiethnic-church-movement-promise.html

Dear Mr. Christian

Episode 127: “Tired.”

Anti-racism is at times emotionally and physically exhausting work, and the causes of this toll are different depending on the person. This week, the members of our team talked about a few of the things that can be wearying about passionately pursuing the work of justice, as well as a few things that we have learned about how to cope more effectively with these periodic situation

Regular listeners to the podcast may notice that we aren’t talking about the book of Acts today, which is strange right after we kicked off the series in episode 125. A number of the members of our team had urgent matters that they needed to attend to the day of our recording, and so as a team we decided to wait to continue our series until a majority of the group was able to be there.

Let’s go now, and listen to this conversation.

CREDITS:

CRCNA Hate Mail citation
Mercy and Justice Staff Report Escalating Intimidation

Blackish Episode: What About Garry

Episode 126: Radical Acts – “Everything in Common.”

Beginning this episode, we are starting a new series on the Antioch Podcast looking at the book of Acts. It is the story of how the Holy Spirit took a mono-ethnic group of followers of Jesus (who could all fit into a second-floor apartment) to a multi-ethnic religious community capable of withstanding the centuries-long persecution of an imperial empire. How is this even possible? This episode begins this series with a look at the seeds of this diverse, justice-seeking community in the second chapter of Acts.

NOTE: Regular listeners will notice that we are missing cover art and links. This week the podcast has been struck with a series of computer viruses, which are being attended to. We pray that soon all things are restored. Until then, this “stripped down” version of the podcast is the best we can do. Our apologies for this inconvienience.

Episode 125: “We’re No Jezebels!”

This week the women of the Antioch Podcast team lead us in a conversation about women’s leadership in the church.  Usually on the Antioch Podcast we have conversations about “Biblical” antiracism.  For those of you new to the podcast, we talk about anti-racism, because racism is a form of oppression. An aspect of God’s desire for humanity is that no humans are oppressed. Christians have a special calling to therefore strive to create a world that treats all people as equals, where one group does not profit off the oppression of another group, and were we tend to the loving caretaking of the planet and our communities because we are all equals.  Christians have not always lived up to this calling.  In fact, the history of Christianity is littered with many stories of how we misused our power to do the opposite.  It is true – In the past, as well as the present – people have misused scripture to justify treating people differently, often based on perceived racial differences.  We on the Antioch Podcast stand in firm opposition to that.  It is why we talk about Biblical antiracism, in the hopes that our conversations are one model (albeit a flawed one) of the kinds of conversations we hope Christians have to keep racism from continuing to infect the body of Christ broadly.

Another form of oppression is gender-based oppression.  Again, people in the past and the present misuse scripture to justify creating a world where men are considered superior, and women inferior.  Some would say this is God’s design, but we on the Antioch Podcast stand in solidarity with women, affirming them in the use of their gifts as co-equals with men, to build up the body of Christ broadly.

But, not all Christians feel this way.  Women with leadership gifts often find it difficult to use their gifts, find employment in religious spaces, or be perceived by some Christian men and women to be as authoritative as men.

Vice President Kamala Harris is running into similar issues as the first female Vice President of the United States.  Some Southern Baptist ministers are calling her a modern-day Jezebel.

Our team had something to say about that.  All three female cohosts of the Antioch Podcast team preach and teach regularly in their home churches and in other institutions, and they took this moment, to talk about their experiences openly on this recording, with us all.  Pastor Reggie was unable to be present at the start of our recording session, but you will hear his voice part-way through as he was able to join us mid-way through the conversation.

CREDITS:

FREE WEBINAR: Black History White Memory – Tuesday, Feb 23 12:00-1:00EST

 

 

Episode 124: “Kinism and Church Culture.”

On February 1st, 2021 Christ the King Reformed Church in Charlotte, Michigan was formally classified as a white nationalist group in an annual report released by the Southern Poverty Law Center. This church was formerly a part of the Christian Reformed Church of North America, the denominational home for most of the members of the Antioch Podcast Team. Christ the King Reformed Church (and it’s now former pastor) left the denomination because the church had been espousing the ideology of Kinism. Kinism teaches that the races should be kept separate in racially pure “religio-ethnic states,” supporting white supremacy. Put more simply, Kinism is essentially a white nationalist interpretation of Christianity. This teaching was declared a heresy by the CRCNA in 2019.

Reggie Smith was one of several staff of the CRCNA initially involved in the Christian Reformed Church’s denominational response to Christ the King and its Kinist ideology back in 2019. In hearing that the church was recently declared a hate group by the Southern Poverty Law Center, he shared his thoughts with the rest of our team, sparking a deeper discussion about the similarities and differences between Kinist ideology and the white dominant culture that pervades many monoracial and multiracial churches in the present day.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.


FREE WEBINAR: Black History White Memory – Tuesday, Feb 23 12:00-1:00EST

 

CREDITS:

Charlotte Church Identified as a White Nationalist Group By Southern Poverty Law Center

Kinism Is A Grievous Sin

5 Things to Know About Kinism

Willie Jennings – After Whiteness

Time Magazine: Ibram X Kendi: This is the Black Renaissance

Winter Soups:
Libby: Vegan Peanut Stew. Libby says, “Instead of tomato paste, I substitute diced tomatoes, fresh, canned, or canned with chilies.”

Susie: Italian Lentil Soup

Eric: Tom Yum Gai

Reggie: Campbell’s Sausage Jambalaya

Episode 123: “Racial Reconciliation Reluctance.”

A recent Lifeway Research study on the American church was released this past week. The study revealed that more pastors believe that they would receive pushback if they spoke on the topic of racial reconciliation than they would have the year before the Trump presidency. While it is true that white Evangelical Christians voted for Donald Trump at rates higher than white Americans in general, it is noteworthy that this now seems to correlate with an increased sense that preaching on the Biblical topic of racial reconciliation is less welcome than it has been in the recent past.

Our team had a few thoughts about this which you’ll hear when you listen.

 
 

CREDITS:

CT News January 2021: Pastors More Reluctant to Preach on Race, Lifeway Research

Photo Gallery: “What would be the title of your autobiography?”