Episode 202: Recovering – “What We Can’t Do, Don’t Want to Do, and Shouldn’t Do (part 2).”

Last episode we talked about discernment – looking at telling the difference between what we can’t do, don’t want to do, and shouldn’t do. It was a great conversation, so if you didn’t get to listen to that, go back one episode and listen to our conversation. You might remember at the end of the last episode, we talked about needing to have a follow up conversation on how to recover from those things that we do. Well, we did not want to disappoint you our listeners – so today, we are back with that conversation. A conversation all about recovering from those things that we can’t do, don’t want to do, and shouldn’t do. So without further ado…

… lets go now and listen, to this conversation!

Episode 201: Discernment – “What I Can’t Do, Don’t Want to Do, or Shouldn’t Do.”

Ever have one of those moments when you are trying to decide if you should say something or not, say yes to something – or not, or maybe get involved with something … or not. Sometimes these decisions can be hard, maybe even tug at our heart-strings or run circles in our minds, wearing down our emotional reserves. In antiracism circles, there are lots of times when the spiritual gift of discernment is something we need. Our team decided to talk about exactly this in this episode we are calling Discernment: what I can’t do, don’t want to do or shouldn’t do.

… let’s go now and listen, to this conversation!


CREDITS:

The Work of Byron Katie

Episode 200: Our 200th Episode! – “What We Have Learned So Far.”

This is our 200th episode of the Antioch Podcast, and our team gathered around the mics today to look back at what we’ve learned over the years leading up to now. We started as a podcast way back in the last few months of the Obama presidency in 2016, and so much has changed in antiracism conversations, and our podcast, since then. We had a lot to say, so…

… lets go now and listen, to this conversation!

Episode 199: Antiracism vs. Compositional Diversity Part 2 of 2

This is part 2 of our two-episode conversation called Antiracism vs. Compositional Diversity: Why seeking justice matters to have true unity in Christian spaces. This live conversation was part of the Unlearn program offered at Calvin University through the Center for Intercultural Student Development. During this week, students, faculty, and the community are invited to educational events and forums to learn and have conversations designed to unlearn biases and promote Biblical antiracism. Jane Bruin, a friend and occasional guest on the Antioch Podcast is one of the organizers of this program. At the end of this broadcast, you will hear Jane as she vets questions from the audience that came in during this live event.

If you missed part 1 of this presentation, go back and listen to Episode 159… or just keep listening – the conversation has been a good one.

When we left off, we had just begun discussing the topic of antiracist worship design – asking questions about song choice, representation in worship, and looking at who gets to make decisions about how worship is done within a particular Christian space.

As we rejoin the conversation, Michelle continues the conversation with another provocative question.

 

CREDITS:

The Next Worship: Glorifying God in a Diverse World – Sandra Maria Van Opstal

https://www.amazon.com/Next-Worship-Glorifying-Diverse-World/dp/0830841296

Episode 198: Antiracism vs. Compositional Diversity part 1 of 2

Unlearn week is a yearly program offered at Calvin University through the Center for Intercultural Student Development. During this week, students, faculty, and the community are invited to educational events and forums to learn and have conversations designed to unlearn biases and promote Biblical antiracism. The Antioch Podcast team was invited to participate in this event, so buckle your audio seatbelts for this two-hour episode.

Jane Bruin, a friend and occasional guest on the Antioch Podcast is one of the organizers of this program. At the end of this broadcast, you will hear Jane as she vets questions from the audience that came in during this live event.

Our topic: Antiracism vs. Compositional Diversity – why seeking justice matters to have true unity in Christian spaces.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

 

CREDITS:

 

The Next Worship: Glorifying God in a Diverse World – Sandra Maria Van Opstal

https://www.amazon.com/Next-Worship-Glorifying-Diverse-World/dp/0830841296

 

 

Jemar Tisby

The Color of Compromise

How to Fight Racism

Episode 197: White Work II – “Understanding Whiteness and Rightness.”

For the past few years, the Antioch Podcast has partnered with the Christian Reformed Church of North America’s Office of Race Relations, Calvin University, and the YWCA in their annual Stand Against Racism events, as well as some other antiracism education livestream events. For the next several weeks, we will bring you encore episodes of those events, including this episode we called White Work: Understanding Whiteness and Rightness. You will notice a few additional guests on our podcast from the first White Work episode, who we invited back a second time.


 

Episode 196: White Work – “Antiracism Journeys of White People.”

For the past few years, the Antioch Podcast has partnered with the Christian Reformed Church of North America’s Office of Race Relations, Calvin University, and the YWCA in their annual Stand Against Racism events, as well as some other antiracism education livestream events. For the next several weeks, we will bring you encore episodes of those events, starting with the episode we called White Work: Antiracism Journeys of White People. This has been the Antioch Podcast’s most listened to episode to date, which we are proud to share with your now. You will notice a few additional guests on our podcast, who have been featured in earlier episodes which you can find in our back catalogue.


 

Episode 195: An Antioch Encore – “Before Unity – January 6, 2020”

There have been hearings in recent weeks about the insurrection that took place on January 6th, 2022 when self-described white nationalists and others – some waving Christian flags – broke in to the capitol building. It was a time when for a while we had bipartisan condemnation of this attack on the nation’s capitol… a unity that has since disintegrated, returning back to the polarization that has characterized so much discourse in recent years.

We remember those days, and wanted to take this moment to release this episode from our archives which first aired the week following the uprising. There wasn’t consensus in the media, or on our team, about how to talk about what had happened … and you will hear that reflected in our word-choices as we converse.

The first voice you will hear will be mine, introducing the episode as I did on January 9, 2020.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.


 

Episode 194: Stereotypes – “When Our Preconceptions Blew Up.”

So you meet someone for the first time, and you have just a couple moments to try to make some assumptions about them so you can have a conversation. You have very little information to go by, and most of it is based on how they look, how they sound, and what if anything you know about their background. Usually, we are making these assumptions in a matter of seconds, based on stereotypes. Sometimes, these are helpful shorthand ways of navigating the world, but other times, these generalities are … well… wrong. And what do you do with that when you are mid-sentence and realize that what you thought about someone was not actually correct. How do you change the conversation? How do you remain open to expanding your categories to really see someone for who they truly are?

Our team of Christian antiracism educators and friends take some time to talk about our stereotypes and the times they were busted in today’s episode.


 

Episode 193: Michelle Loyd-Paige – “Transitions: Knowing When To Move On.”

Michelle Loyd Paige is one of the 6 co-hosts of the Antioch Podcast you have gotten to know over the past few years. Some of you listen because Michelle is on the podcast, and some of you keep listening because while you don’t know Michelle personally, you feel like you do after listening so long. Her voice is a voice of wisdom, having served as a chief diversity officer for decades at her institution. Michelle is going to retire at the conclusion of the 2022-2023 academic year, and we took the opportunity today to talk about this transition a couple weeks after the public announcement of her retirement.

Michelle shares about her long tenure doing Diversity, Equity and Inclusion work – doing this work long before the acronym DEI even became an acronym… as well as what it means to actually get to retire from, instead of resign from, an institution working tirelessly for antiracism in the classrooms, task rooms, and board rooms of her institution.


 

Episode 192: Belonging – “Diversity, Equity and Inclusion.”

I live in a pretty diverse area. I can go to a number of grocery stores in my neighborhood and see people from many racial and ethnic communities all shopping for the things they need to feed their families. But there is one, large grocery store in my are that is part of a regional chain that stands out because of the people who shop there. You can go there any time of day and see people who belong to numerous raical and ethnic commiunites. Some people avoid this grocery store because it is diverse. They have derogatory names for the store, and they will drove a few miles out of their way to shop at another grocery store within the same chain that has less racial or ethnic diversity in terms of the people who shop there. Other people love shopping there because of the great variety of people who shop there. These people may feel that they are supporting a business that proudly serves a diverse constituency. They may assume that because the shoppers are diverse, that this store is also inclusive and equitable.

But not everyone who shops at this large grocery store in my neighborhood is able get everything they need to make a meal that tastes like home. True, the people shopping at that store are diverse, but the store does not include everything they need to fix their family meal. For some of the shoppers, it is necessary to shop at several markets to find what they need to have a taste of home. The store is not equitable for every shopper, because it doesn’t take into account the grocery needs of the entire diverse community. This might be missed by people whose grocery needs can always be met by shopping at this one, large store filled with diverse people. For a lot of shoppers, they might not know who to ask for what they need. For others, they will get some ingredients from the big grocery store, but will get some or most of their groceries from other markets that cater to their region or ethnic community. And some people might not be able to find what they need anywhere, because there is not even enough people to make it profitable to have a business that caters to their needs. They may need to make due with what they can find available by pulling together disparate ingredients from a few places to make something approximating home.

Belonging is more of a sense than something that can be observed. And yet, it is so very important to building a community. Most churches want to be these kinds of inclusive communities. Some churches even have antiracism teams to try to make their congregations more welcoming or inclusive. Others are trying to make their congregations places where any number of groups can thrive who may have been overlooked or marginalized. Our smaller team had a conversation about belonging today that I think you will really want to hear. So…

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.


 

Group Discussion Questions:

1.) What are examples or definitions of these four concepts: Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging? How do these ideas interact?

2.) Jane talks about retention is a way to measure belonging. Look at the diversity characteristics of people who make up your church, community or institution? Use these diversity characteristics to describe the people who make up the majority of the constituency, and what kinds of people make up smaller parts of your constituency. Now look at the people who make up the staff, board, or constituency of your church, community or institution. What kinds of people tend to have longevity? What kinds of people tend to leave? When looking at staffing, are there bitter breakups that have happened along these demographic lines? How has your church, community or institution responded to these breakup situations?

3.) Another way of measuring belonging is measuring how long people with different diversity characteristics talk when there are meetings. What do you notice about who talks the most in terms of groups of people who share the same diversity characteristics? Which groups of people talk little, or do not talk at all? What can be done to solicit feedback from people who may not be talking?

4.) Many organizations form teams that gather to achieve a task. Sometimes, these teams are intentionally designed to include a diversity of people with the aim of being a space that makes decisions based on the needs of diverse constituencies. However, these intentions assume that the group already trusts and values one another’s perspectives, and that people feel that they can give their thoughts without negative consequences. What practices do Jane and Eric talk about to illustrate how trust has been built on teams they have been a part of who have done this well?

5.) Handling disagreements is an expected part of being part of a diverse community. How does your church, community, or institution handle disagreements? When are diverse opinions welcomed and when is there an emphasis on agreement being a necessary element of belonging? How do these kinds of institutional responses impact conversation and the willingness of members to share their thoughts openly and honestly? Look at question 3 to see who may be talking or not talking to inform your reflections.

6.) Eric talks about praying for the needs of people who don’t agree. How do we pray about the emotions and desires of people we disagree with? How might that shape our hearts individually, or our congregations or communities collectively? What would be challenging about this personally and collectively?

7.) What do you know about Intercultural Conflict Styles? What is the way you handle conflict in the culture you live in now? Is it the same or different in any significant ways from the way conflicts are handled in the culture of your family or culture of origin?

Here is a description of the Intercultural Conflict Styles model from icsinventory.com:

The innovative, four-quadrant intercultural conflict style model, developed by Dr. Mitchell R. Hammer, provides a roadmap to how people use specific culturally grounded strategies for communicating ideas, resolving disagreements, and dealing with emotional upset. The ICS Inventory assesses culturally learned approaches for communicating information and resolving conflict in terms of Direct or Indirect strategies for “working through” substantive disagreements and emotionally Restrained or Expressive approaches for dealing with emotional upset.

To learn more about the ICS Inventory, go to https://icsinventory.com.

8.) Teams often make decisions for larger groups of people. What teams are you a part of now or in the past? What are stories from your past where a team you were a part of made decisions that helped more people belong? What did you decide and do that helped widen the circle? Do you have stories of being excluded from groups that still carry emotional weight with you? What was that like?

Episode 191: “Living With What We Can’t’ Control.”

The Serenity Prayer is perhaps one of the most well known prayers spoken by millions of people in recovery programs around the world every day. It goes like this:
God, grant me the serenity to accept the things I cannot change
The courage to change the things I can
And the wisdom to know the difference.

The original version of this prayer was written by American theologian Reinhold Niebuhr, and the prayer is longer than those first three lines… but within those 27 words is an implicit challenge to have the wisdom to know when to press for change, and when to accept things that are unchangeable. So… when do you decide to lean into acceptance, and when do you press into change? There is a lot in the world that needs to change, but most of it takes more energy than any one of us has. So what do we do?

Our team of Christian antiracism educators and friends gathered around the microphones to talk about exactly that.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

CREDITS:
Everybody, Somebody, Anybody, and Nobody
https://www.smart-jokes.org/everybody-somebody-anybody-and-nobody.html

Episode 190 “Talking About Race Across the Generations.”

Maybe you can relate to this. You want to talk about something deep, something important with someone of a different generation than you. You love them, you love them a LOT. But you also realize that you are pretty different in a lot of ways as well. You like different music, get information from different places, use different terms, maybe even care about different causes or political ideologies. You might even read the same Bible, but interpret it differently … and can’t see how something that is so clear to you can be so difficult for another person to see. But you want to have this conversation … and it seems to go nowhere. You get stuck in the same place each time, or are turned off by one another’s language, one another’s progressivism or conservatism, or the sense that in the conversation you start to devalue one another.

In the past few years, the nation has become increasingly polarized. Important conversations aren’t happening. It affects churches, social circles, and families… often along generational lines. Some of these conversations are about race, some are about justice, and some are about just about responding to the changing world. Some of us don’t think that people are changing fast enough, and others of us don’t want it to change as fast … or maybe change back to the way things were before, or change because we have new information now that we didn’t have before. There is a lot of complexity.

These intergenerational conversations are increasingly needed and increasingly rare. Our team of antiracism educators and friends talk candidly about how we experience these conversations in our conversation that we want to share with all of you.

Episode 189: What’s The Problem With CRT? – “A Conversation About Fear, Faith and Racial Justice.”

There are a lot of things in the news lately about justice.  Seems like about every other week there is something – some new insult, a new threat, a fresh tragedy – that makes headlines and fill our social media feeds with something to get upset about.  It can be emotionally overwhelming and over time, exhausting. 

One of the many things that has made headlines more and more often is Critical Race Theory, or CRT for short.  More and more institutions and legislators are pushing back against CRT, “wokeness” and talk of racial injustice as if there is a general understanding that CRT is this bad thing that needs to be exterminated from public life.  But how many people really understand what CRT is… or how many people assume they know what it is, because they heard that it was dangerous from someone whose opinion matters to them?  What’s the problem with CRT? 

This is the question that prompted today’s Antioch Podcast conversation.  It was a conversation we had live in a webinar in conjunction with the YWCA’s annual Stand Against Racism event.  This year, the Antioch Podcast was honored to speak at this event in conjunction with our partners at Calvin University and the Christian Reformed Church of North America’s Office of Race Relations.  This 90-minute conversation is what we are about to share with you now.  Resources mentioned in this podcast, including our prior 5-part Antioch Podcast series on CRT – which we mention, can be found in the links on the episode page for this podcast.

The first voice you will hear is Idella Winfield, a staff member of the CRCNA’s Office of Race Relations, who opened up this presentation.

 


CREDITS:

THE ANTIOCH PODCAST MINISERIES CHRISTIANITY & CRT (With Study Guides)
Episode 115 Christianity & CRT – Understanding Social Justice
Episode 116 Christianity & CRT – Understanding Systemic Sin
Episode 117 Christianity & CRT – Understanding Marxism and Biblical Justice
Episode 119 Christianity & CRT – BLM & Traditional Biblical Sexuality
Episode 121 Christianity & CRT – An Interview With Dr. Kelly Hamren, Author of Understanding Critical Race Theory, Marxism and Biblical Ethics

 

PEOPLE OF COLOR who are CHRISTIAN AUTHORS AND INFLUENCERS

Robert Chao Romero – author of The Brown Church; co-author of Christianity and Critical Race Theory

Christina Edmondson – co-author of Faithful Antiracsm and co-host of Truth’s Table podcast

Lisa Sharon Harper – author of The Very Good Gospel and Fortune

Esau McCauley – author of Reading While Black

Natasha Robinson – author of A Sojourner’s Truth and Voices of Lament

Dante Stewart – author of Shouting’ in the Fire

Jemar Tisby – author of The Color of Compromise, How to Fight Racism, and founder of The Witness: A Black Christian Collective

Rich Villodas – author of the Deeply Formed Life

 

Other authors mentioned in this episode:

Ibram X Kendi – author of Stamped From the Beginning: The Definitive History of Racist Ideas in America

Mark T. Mulder – author of Shades of White Flight: Evangelical Congregations and Urban Departure

 

Organizations mentioned in this episode:

CORR: Communities Organizing for Racial Equity https://www.corrnow.org

 

Additional Antioch-Related Antiracism Efforts:

The Ripple Consulting Pilot Cohort is a six month virtual cohort designed for white Community Leaders, Educators, Spiritual Leaders, and DEIB+ (Diversity, Equity, Inclusion, and Belonging) Advocates to grow in awareness of the internalization process that has resulted from systemic racism. Bimonthly sessions include teaching, large and small group discussions, and inter-faith experientials.

Susie Dixon, one of our co-hosts will be co-facilitating the cohort. Go to https://forms.gle/wWujc6D3Tmjqc3WL8 for more information.

 

Episode 188: Not Today. – “Conversations We Can’t Handle Right Now.”

Here’s the situation.  You are minding your business, and someone comes up and asks you a question … one of those kinds of questions.  The kind because you are a person of color, or because you are interested in matters of race and justice, or because you are just you.  It doesn’t matter why exactly but you are put on the spot and asked your opinion on an issue having to do with racism, racial justice, or another potentially controversial topic having to do with your racial or ethnic identity or other diversity characteristics. 

You feel your heart jump, your stomach drop, and your mind is racing.  Perhaps the question is offensive.  You might wonder if the person knows that it is offensive, or whether or not you should let them know that.  Maybe the person asking has a reputation for asking those kind of “gotcha” questions, or just wants you to confirm their bias, political beliefs, or worldview that you really don’t agree with.  Or maybe to answer the question you would need to share that you deeply disagree with them, and you would rather just preserve the relationship and not talk about something that will put that in jeopardy.  Maybe you have been hurt in the past by someone who asked this same question, and now you are bracing to be hurt again.  Deep down you know you will never really know their motive for asking the question, but you probably are trying to guess what it is, though. 

And at the same time, you are wondering, “Do I have energy for this right now?”  If some racial tragedy was just in the news, you might already be feeling worn down and would like nothing more than to save what remaining strength you have to finish out the day and go home to rest.  But… you can’t because you were stopped by this person asking you this question.  Your mind goes from racing to paralyzingly blank … and the only thing registering is the thought, “Not today…”

If you are a person of color, or someone who is interested in antiracism, this scenario isn’t hypothetical.  It happens, for some people it happens frequently.  It is the thing we on the Antioch Podcast talk about off mic often, which is why we decided to have an on-mic conversation about “those” conversations with all of you.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation. 

Episode 187: Should I Stay Or Should I Go? – “Counting the Cost of Belonging.”

In the past 2 years of so, many Americans have quit one job and taken another job … a phenomenon being called “The Great Resignation.” For some, a part of this calculation had to do with the toll their jobs had on their finances, mental health, and sense of safety. But this is an antiracism podcast, so let’s talk about the racial implications of the great resignation. Many racial justice advocates have been asking questions of themselves and their institutions about whether the cost of belonging at their institution was a price they were willing to pay any longer – especially if the institutions they worked for were not advocating for systemic or antiracist policies to improve the lives of their employees and care more justly for the communities or congregations they serve. For many, it is a matter of calculating how much influence they have against the work left to do. When is staying helpful, because you are influencing change, and when does belonging become complicity in a system that is harming some people? What if that system is your faith community, denomination, or church? Should we stay, or should we go?

These are important questions, which we are about to get into, in today’s episode among our team of Christian antiracism educators and friends.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

Episode 186: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Community.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we are in the final episode of our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices.

Our team gathered today to talk about the antiracist spiritual practice of being in community. Our team of six Christian antiracism educators and friends is one such community… but community is much broader, spanning such diverse communities as congregations, organizations, and friends. Three of our usual contributors gathered to talk about how being part of spiritually-forming communities is an essential part of each of our antiracist spiritual practices.

Episode 185.2: Patrick Lyoya – “Race and Policing in the City of Churches.”

This is a special episode of the Antioch Podcast: Conversations About Biblical Antiracsim.

On Monday, April 4th, Patrick Loyoya, a black man who immigrated from the Congo, was shot by a white police officer here in Grand Rapids, Mi – the city where this podcast is recorded. The struggle occurred following a traffic stop for improper tags on his license plate. Our city is reeling. There are protests in the streets and barricades around the police station in the center of the city. This incident today is the lead story on the national news. And it is Holy Week. We recorded this episode on Good Friday – when we remember the death of Jesus at the hands of the Roman government.

There is this hypothetical situation that many of us have asked over the years as so many black men and women, have died in very public ways at the hands of police across the nation. This hypothetical question is, “What would we do if this happened in our city?” That moment is now for those of us here … and because we wanted to share our conversation with all of you, today’s conversation is being released with minimal editing as you will hear us process in real time, our thoughts and feelings about this tragic event.

Episode 185: Antiracist Spiritual Practices: Preaching.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we continue our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices. Spiritual practices form us as believers to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul mind and strength and love our neighbor as ourselves. Practicing antiracism is one of those ways in which we love our neighbor. The spiritual disciplines in this series are classic, spiritual disciplines to be sure, and our team talks about how these classic disciplines can help us practice racial justice and equity in ways solidly grounded in scripture.

Today our team gathered to talk about antiracist preaching. Our team is comprised of quite a number of pastors and preachers … pretty much everyone on the team except me, which is great because they know what they are talking about in this conversation you are about to hear.

Episode 184: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Communion Part 2.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we continue our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices. Spiritual practices form us as believers to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul mind and strength and love our neighbor as ourselves. Practicing antiracism is one of those ways in which we love our neighbor. The spiritual disciplines in this series are classic, spiritual disciplines to be sure, and our team talks about how these classic disciplines can help us practice racial justice and equity in ways solidly grounded in scripture.

Today’s conversation is the second of two conversations we had on communion. In these conversations, we talk about inclusion, representation, community, and forgiveness – all within a historically Biblical context. This is a fascinating conversation that I am excited for you to hear.

Episode 183: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Communion Part 1.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we continue our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices. Spiritual practices form us as believers to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul mind and strength and love our neighbor as ourselves. Practicing antiracism is one of those ways in which we love our neighbor. The spiritual disciplines in this series are classic, spiritual disciplines to be sure, and our team talks about how these classic disciplines can help us practice racial justice and equity in ways solidly grounded in scripture.

Today’s conversation is the first of two conversations we had on communion. In these conversations, we talk about inclusion, representation, community, and forgiveness – all within a historically Biblical context. This is a fascinating conversation that I am excited for you to hear.

Episode 182: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Tithing and Giving Part 2.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we continue our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices. Spiritual practices form us as believers to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul mind and strength and love our neighbor as ourself. Practicing antiracism is one of those ways in which we love our neighbor. The spiritual disciplines in this series are classic, spiritual disciplines to be sure, and our team talks about how these classic disciplines can help us practice racial justice and equity in ways solidly grounded in scripture.

Today’s conversation is the second of two conversations on tithing and giving. We pick up where we left off last week and talk about pay equity, how money affects individuals and institutions, and end with a lengthy discussion of the unseen cost of emotional labor. You are not going to want to miss a minute of this conversation about money and meaning.

Episode 181: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Tithing & Giving Part 1.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we continue our series on Antiracist Spiritual Practices. Spiritual practices form us as believers to love the Lord our God with all our heart, soul mind and strength and love our neighbor as ourself. Practicing antiracism is one of those ways in which we love our neighbor. The spiritual disciplines in this series are classic, spiritual disciplines to be sure, and our team talks about how these classic disciplines can help us practice racial justice and equity in ways solidly grounded in scripture.

Today’s conversation is the first of two conversations on tithing and giving. You won’t want to miss a minute of what turned out to be a lively conversation…. Ok, I want to tell you more, but I’m not going to give any spoilers.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

 

 

Episode 180: Antiracist Spiritual Practices – “Lent & Crowding Out Jesus.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, we talk about what the Lenten season means, how we each practice it, and reflect on how practicing Lenten disciplines has shaped our faith journeys as Christians. This is a conversation full of good questions, which we hope, cause you to reflect as well during this holy season.

Let’s go now and listen to this conversation.

 

 

CREDITS:

Donna Barber: Bread for the Resistance: Forty Devotions for Justice People

Gary Zimak: Give Up Worry for Lent: 40 days to Finding Peace in Christ

Shekinah Glory Ministry – Yes

Episode 179 “Reflections on Black History Month.”

Today on the Antioch Podcast, members of our team take a break from our series on Spiritual Disciplines to reflect on Black History Month. Members of our team share their thoughts on the meaning of the observance for them personally, as well as, for the nation and church. Their conversation draws connections between the past and present concern of “erasing” the Black experience and racism from history books, the church, and our collective memory. Together the team asserts that a continued engagement with history is essential to provide context for the present.